red-haired woman blasted by misophonia trigger

Welcome to Misophonia Online, a website that answers the question “What is misophonia”?

Do you have an emotional reaction to hearing someone eat with their mouth open, chew gum, or clear their throat? Do you become enraged when you hear repetitive sounds (tapping, pen clicking, typing, etc.) that make you want to escape? Ever feel like lashing out at the source of these sounds? Furthermore, have you ever wondered why you experience these reactions or if you’re the only one who has these problems? When your trigger events occur, does it seem like other people don’t take any notice of the sounds that affect you so strongly?

Guess what…

You’re not alone!

This website provides support to those who have this little-known syndrome and brings awareness of sound sensitivities to the public.

Misophonia is not thought to be caused by an actual hearing problem. The latest research suggests it is sensory processing issue within the brain. Misophonia elicits immediate negative physiological responses to certain sounds that most people don’t seem to notice. This sensitivity can have an adverse effect on a person’s life causing problems with activities of daily living. Interactions with significant people can also be affected by misophonia causing conflict within personal relationships. The disorder can have a harmful effect on one’s support system because the potential for social isolation exists. Sometimes, people with misophonia become withdrawn and shy away from others at school, work, and social situations.

Here, one can find resources that provide information, suggestions for coping mechanisms, and tips to help manage symptoms. Now that the question “What is Misophonia?” has been introduced, it’s time for further exploration. Please accept this invitation to join our discussions, learn about symptoms and triggers, and get answers to your questions about misophonia.

Need a brochure for yourself or to give to someone else? Download an informative misophonia brochure in Microsoft Word format here or an Adobe .pdf file here. You can help educate people about this disorder and give them an answer to the question of “What is Misophonia?”

If you have misophonia, please share your thoughts and answer the question “What misophonia means to me.

Letters explaining misophonia

Letters to Friends/Family

Introduce/Explain Misophonia

Take the Misophonia Self Test

FaceBook Support Group

(for those with the disorder)

Are you a spouse, family member, friend, or co-worker of someone with misophonia? Visit the Misophonia Alliance Support Group.





23 Comments

  1. Kelly Parkhill

    I’ve had misophonia since I was in my teens. The worst noises for me is my step dad making noises especially loud sex noises. I’ve tried everything to help me cope but nothing has worked. It’s making my life hell and it’s making me and my mum fight too. I’ve got over 26 health problems and needing sleep is what my body needs but trying to sleep isn’t working

    Reply
  2. Toby

    I work with a guy who is always groaning, grunting, growling or some other such “sound effect”.

    I’m not a big talker, and when he isn’t making these sound effects he is incessantly talking about who knows what.

    Conversely, songs with repetitive lyrics really get to me… the same four words 50 times is not music and frankly it drives me bonkers to the point I will turn the radio off and drive in silence.

    I just found this page today and I am really glad I did.

    Reply
  3. Cynthia Antill

    OMG! I’m so glad I found this web site. I thought I was going crazy. Chewing, slurping through a straw, crunching ice, typing on key boards. My mom eating grapes today!!! I thought I was going to come out of my skin!! I had to go to another room! It was deafening.
    I can’t enjoy a meal with My Family and I struggle at work to stay focus and drown out noises.

    Reply
  4. Anonymous14

    Wrote this poem on how I feel. Feedback, please.

    My ears hurt
    as I shove one of my pink headphones in one ear
    and a green earplug in the other
    My ears hurt
    as I turn the volume of my music up
    trying to drown out the noise
    My ears hurt
    as I cover them with my hands blocking out the noise it makes
    when a metal fork scrapes on a plate
    My ears hurt
    as my sisters play a dog whistle and I react like a dog
    withering in pain begging for them to stop
    My ears hurt
    as they laugh thinking it’s the funniest thing
    My ears hurt
    as my father adds another fish tank
    and my sister says that it’s all in my head
    My ears hurt
    as I move away from my little sister
    having to be so far away
    but wishing to be close
    My ears hurt
    as I cry myself to sleep
    wishing they would stop
    My ears hurt
    as I feel the panic start to rise and take over
    when a noise reaches my ears
    My ears hurt
    as the anger sets in
    and starts to take over
    along with the sadness
    My ears hurt
    as the exhaustion takes over
    My ears hurt
    as I find myself alone with this feeling
    My ears hurt
    as I listen to people telling me I’m crazy
    and it’s all in my head
    My ears hurt
    as I look at the annoyed expressions on others faces
    pleading with then from my eyes, my soul
    to understand
    that I can’t help it
    i didn’t ask for this
    My ears hurt
    as the feeling of guilt consumes me
    while I ask people to turn off the volume to something
    My ears hurt
    as I feel the anxiety that they might say no
    and the frustration of when and if they do
    My ears hurt
    as I avoid sleeping over at my friends house
    in fear the they snore or deep breath
    My ears hurt
    as I cry and ask ‘why me?’
    My ears hurt
    as I wish to be deaf
    My ears hurt
    as I come to realize they’ll hurt for the rest of my life
    My heart hurts
    as my ears constantly hurt
    a pain that eats at me and slowly destroys me
    For I have Misophonia and
    my ears hurt

    Reply
  5. Igorlakonov

    Good morning!

    Can I contact administrator?
    It is about advertisement on your website.

    Thank you.

    Reply
  6. Sylvia

    I am bothered by bass. It’s not just an old age problem. I didn’t like bass when I was young. I would always turn the treble all the way up and the bass all the way down when listening to music. I didn’t have too much problem with noise before the creation of boom boxes.

    It is not just the loudness that bothers me. It is how the vibrations feel to my inner ear. I can feel the vibrations at zero volume, for example if a car playing a stereo is still too far away to be audible or if someone turns down the boom box so that it isn’t audible, but failed to turn it until it clicks off.
    For me, the louder it is, the worse it seems, but even at low volumes the vibrations are agitating.

    I am wondering if other people with misophonia also feel the vibrations of the sounds they are sensitive to. Do people who can’t stand the sound of smacking and chewing also feel the vibrations?

    Reply
  7. NeedHelpBoomSounds

    Can someone help me? I am having a problem when it comes to certain sounds, I wouldnt say that they anger or irritate me. Its just that I need to know about them or know what causes it to sound that way.

    The kind of sounds I am talking about is what I would consider powerful sounds, whether impact, pop, explosion sounds or something… I dont know how to explain it. I get a feeling that lets me say “wow, shit, that was fucking powerful, damn” in a soft/low underwhemling tone as if I felt the power of God. Again, I dont know how to explain it.. but they do sound powerful, (but im having a feeling that im the only one who thinks that because no one else seem to react or care about them)

    The only thing I can tell you is that they dont usually have any effect on me when very close by, but if it is given a little distance it affects me.

    The only info I can give for these sounds are the things that cause them the most:
    1) SoccerBall kicking sounds, not too far away.
    2) People slamming down hard in bounce house sounds.
    3) Garbage truck bonging noises
    4) Some sounds of stomping/running/etc upstairs (usually caused by kids playing)
    5) Door slamming sounds (very rare, its like 1% chance for a door to have the sound composure to have an effect on me)
    6) Fireworks/Explosions (same as above, if I tell someone to send me powerful explosion/firework sounds, its a great chance that it will not have any effect on me, it will not sound the same as the true very powerful ones)
    7) Its present in some farting/burping bodily sounds but as I said above, its very rare and people dont care about them, they ignore them while I sit there in awe. If I tell someone to find some powerful sound online and send it to me, then Im pretty sure they will send something that has no effect on me.

    Is this some kind of Misophonia or something? I really need help. I also need to understand these sounds so I can present them in a creative work I am planning to create. I have been trying to understand them for 5 straight years to the point I am failing school, I have 100000000 pages of theories of these sounds but they all failed when tested against hearing one of these sounds again.

    If you tell me that they are just “bass sounds”, then I will let you know that most bass sounds I hear dont have any effect on me, so that is failed theory.

    I really need help.

    Reply
  8. Adeline

    I can’t stand chewing noises and I try to tell that to my mom but I end up getting in trouble and she won’t let me use white noise with my head phones when we eat so I have retreated to spend most of my time in my bed room but I want to be social. When they eat I get so angry but if I tell my mom how I feel she just thinks it is because I am 13 but I can’t stop it. It makes me feel like I want to crack my skull against the table to make it stop.

    Reply
    • Tara

      Adelin, I went through the same experience when I was your age. Which is generally when this condition presents itaelf. At that time I had never heard of misophonia. One day I told my mom that it was something that was a real condition. She googled it and realized this description was me to a T. She now totally understands the issues I have. I saw above they have pamphlets, have you ever tried to show your mom those? If you have and she is just ingnorant to the condition I am sorry. I hope this helps. Sometimes I feel crazy but realizing it is a medical condition makes me feel a little better .

      Reply
    • V

      Hi. I am grateful for this website. I have suffered all of my life since about the age of 12. I am now in my 50s. I believe this is due to the lack of control we have over sounds. The people chomping or speaking loudly or smashing their keyboard do no even think about it let alone why is offensive. i think our “pain” comes from the dis of consideration and manners. Perhaps there is a way to educate people.

      Reply
  9. Megan

    When my roommate agrees with something she says “uh-huh” four or five times really fast and it makes me want to punch her in the face and tell her to shut up. She also has to fill any silence with singing or talking about things I know nothing about, like her “adorable little cousin who did the cutest thing the other day.” I’ve never met him, stop telling me shit about stuff I don’t care or know about!

    Reply
    • Alex

      I hate listening to people on the phone who say “uh-huh” or “m-hmm” over and over again, one of many things that gets to me so I can relate. Also please don’t punch her; I haven’t thrown a punch since I was ten, there are several other options such as drinking and smoking! I recommend trying it with your roommate to bond (worst ideas there are probably tequila and whiskey but everyones different, stuff makes me rowdy).

      Reply
    • S Rowe

      Suggest you own the silent times by talking about something that room mates 1. hates 2. knows nothing about, 3. goes over her head leaving her feeling small then she may learn to value quiet time.

      Reply
    • ——

      I can totally relate to you with part about your friend constantly talking about her cousin. Although mine always talks about her baby sister. Is always “my sister this, she did this and blah blah blah.” And then when I talk about my cousin she shuts me down. It’s annoying and I get mad.

      Reply
  10. Evans Horlik

    It all started when I was around 8 or 9 years old. It’s been 8 years and it’s getting worse every single day. I try to control it, I try to hold myself and listen to these voices thinking that perhaps I would be able to overcome my misophonia by getting used to these sounds but it was no use. I still hate those sounds, it still triggers me, it still makes me wanna shout or hit something, or someone. It’s still the same and it drives me crazy. I have a friend who’s close to me and she has this habit of eating (and even drinking) loudly. She munched like every 5 seconds even if there’s no foods in her mouth and it really just so hard for me to be around her, but I feel guilty to tell her to stop it because it is her right to do anything she wants and I don’t want to make her feel uncomfortable with trying to change her habits and all. So far only my little brother knows about this, the other doesn’t know, or they do but they don’t care anyway, which hurts even more. It is so painful that I wish I was born deaf instead, even though I know I should be grateful that I could hear. But what’s the good in it if everything that I listen to causes me to suffer? I really don’t get it.

    Reply
  11. Gary Smith

    Richard, it might be interesting to explore our feelings about and reactions towards the sources of sound triggers in our lives. I have the same sensitivities as you described — and having just found this site and the FB group, imagine almost everyone reading does also. We may not be able to adjust our environments, and for me talking with others about the issue has only complicated the problem. I find the best approach is to work on my ‘inner landscape’ so I can integrate with those who are unaware of the issue for us misophoniacs.

    Reply
  12. Richard

    Thank god there’s some kind of support out there. I’ll pursue more information about this. I just discovered it has a name. At this very moment, there’s a co-worker sitting next to me who can’t chew gum with her mouth closed. Smack, smack, crack, pop, smack, smack, smack… And on my right, is a guy who snorts his post-nasal drip every 30 seconds. I just popped in some earphones. But my question is this: Why do I have to adjust MY environment because someone else can’t chew with their mouth closed? I know I sound like an ass but for the moment I’m blaming my “misophonia”.

    Reply
    • Jason

      I have the same issue which I am blaming on the introduction of open plan (cheap) offices combined with people not caring about others when it comes to talking loudly on the phone, eating lunch at their desk (freaking apples every 15 mins lately) and slurping coffee. I have raised this issue with my manager twice now only to be brushed off.

      Reply
      • Orion Sune

        Same issue here. Open office plan. Been complaining of the distracting noises for over a year. I get the same response from my managers.

        Reply
    • Joyce Grindstaff

      I feel your pain. I have 3 coworkers on my shift at work. Two of them are LOUD chip eaters and the third one is…my trigger. For 12 hours she crunches ice, slurps, chews gum (all of this open mouthed).
      My Dr actually have me a prescription of Klonopin for those times when I begin to feel the rage building.
      This is the most horrible thing I’ve ever experienced.

      Reply

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