Want to help get the word out on misophonia? Wish that it was more well-known?
Here are some ways you can get involved:

There are many things that one can do to help with the www.misophonia.com website or the Facebook group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/misophoniasupport/). Don’t be afraid to ask if something you’re interested in isn’t mentioned in the notes below. Let me know what you’d like to do to help promote awareness of misophonia in the community.

1) Update the monthly www.misophonia.com survey.

Currently, the monthly surveys don’t change often. But regular updated and new inquiries would benefit the effectiveness of the survey. Misophonia.com uses http://www.surveymoz.com/ to create and gather the survey data. Making a new survey each month is as simple as copying the old one, renaming it and publishing it. It takes only a moment to do this.

Ideally, the survey would be updated/modified from time to time by changing or adding questions. Changes could be general or specific to topics trending on the Facebook group. Changes in the format of the survey could also be made. There are features of surveymoz that we’re not currently making use of so there’s room for improvement. An interested person could run with the project and make the monthly surveys more dynamic.

2) Become a Moderator of the Facebook Misophonia Support Group.

Currently, no new moderators are needed but please make an inquiry if you would like to be on the waiting list.
 

A Moderator is like an admin in that they can:

• Approve or deny membership requests
• Remove posts and comments on posts
• Remove and block people from the group
• Pin or unpin a post

Moderators work with the admin to promote the group and keep it focused on the goals and established guidelines. They keep things working smoothly.

A Moderator’s role can include:

Active participation in the group.
Monitoring posts and removing posts that don’t meet the group guidelines.
Cautioning members about a post they’ve made and let them know if it runs against the group’s goals or focus.
Step in when an argument ensues and either redirect the conversation or remove a person who is inappropriate or disruptive to the group.

Moderators are sometimes peacekeepers. But in this group they don’t pick sides or push a specific agenda. Sometimes, moderators may ask questions or present new topics to create conversations about misophonia. A moderator works with the admin and other moderators. In time, each moderator develops their own style and approach to group administration.

Qualifications for becoming a moderator:

a) have a personal Facebook page that the misophonia support group members can access
b) not be a moderator, admin or webmaster for any other Facebook page or website related to misophonia
c) be a team player with a sense of fair play but still adhere to the established group guidelines
d) not promote/support any one treatment, coping strategy, or approach to understanding and managing misophonia
e) support ALL members even when that member’s point of view or means of expression is different from the moderator’s view

3) Be a proof reader, researcher/investigator, or content manager.

Being a Proof Reader means checking the website content for typos and grammar gaffs. The goal is to present a well-crafted and organized website. Proofreaders would report any problems found to the webmaster (paul.dion@misophonia.com).

Researchers and Investigators search existing misophonia-related Facebook groups and websites to report on what’s trending. This information is then used to make suggestions for content, images, and features.

Content Managers suggest new features or changes to the way information gets presented. They might offer insight into new theories on treatment or coping with misophonia. Also, content managers can write new material or adapt existing material for clarity.

4) Be a contributing writer!

The misophonia.com website needs to be remain relevant. And a website is only as good as the information it contains. New information about misophonia is of great interest to the site’s visitors. Submitting articles about misophonia would be a great way to contribute to the quality of the website’s content.

People want to know what’s happening and they also like to know how other people cope with misophonia. Contributing writers can write about any topic relating to misophonia. For more information on being a contributing writer: http://www.misophonia.com/guest-writers.

5) Run the Misophonia Support Forum.

Did you know there is a Misophonia Support Forum?
The forum is a message board with these sections:
general posts
success stories
support
medications
research
teenagers only
family & friends

The message board is in need of someone to take the reins and promote the forum and oversee its operation. This is an opportunity to make a significant contribution to the misophonia community. This forum is a self-contained Facebook-alternative. It offers an organized, searchable interactive information and social experience. The support forum currently has 4,755 members. Curious? Check it out here: http://www.misophonia.com/Forum

Did you see something that you would like to do? Send an email to paul.dion@misophonia.com and introduce yourself and explain what you’re interested in. You’ll receive a quick and friendly reply.