Misokinesia (visual triggers)

The word misokinesia describes having negative feelings about something seen. The sight of a particular movement is involved. Often, it’s a repetitive motion. Misokinesia can sometimes accompany misophonia. People with misokinesia have visual triggers. While those with misophonia have issues with sounds. But, not everyone that has misophonia has misokinesia. And, vice versa.

When asked about misokinesia, members of the Facebook misophonia support group came up with hundreds of examples of visual triggers. Many of them involved the face. Or, movements of fingers, hands, and legs. People also mentioned other visual triggers like windshield wipers, fans, and lights.

 

Visual Triggers are very similar to Sound Triggers

Visual triggers produce the same problems as sound triggers. They cause negative emotions like anger, disgust, and sometimes rage. Like misophonia, a person’s sensitivity can fluctuate. Although, it depends on individual circumstance. Sleep, diet, exercise, and the source of the visual all matter. Visual triggers are not universal. They are unique to the individual.

Unlike misophonia, it is more difficult to avoid visual triggers. A person with misophonia can wear earplugs or headphones. But a person with misokinesia cannot limit their eyesight. Still, the general avoidance techniques used for misophonia can be very helpful.

Top 50 Visual Triggers

(As reported by the Facebook Misophonia Support Group – In no particular order)

  1. Leg tapping, shaking
  2. Foot tapping, thumping
  3. Chewing, open or closed mouth
  4. Nodding
  5. Teeth brushing
  6. Hiccupping
  7. Finger tapping
  8. Fiddling with hair
  9. Toe wiggling
  10. Nail or finger picking
  11. Nail biting
  12. Fingers in mouth
  13. Licking lips, licking other
  14. Thumb sucking
  15. Flickering or flashing lights
  16. Twiddling thumbs
  17. Hair twisting
  18. Yawning
  19. Touching the nose, flaring nostrils
  20. Bringing a cup up to the mouth
  21. Spitting
  22. Opening a package
  23. Lights, blinking or strobe effect
  24. Dragging feet
  25. Pen tapping
  26. Nose when sniffling
  27. Fingers in ears
  28. Fiddling with keys or coins
  29. Stroking a beard
  30. Scratching
  31. Hand to mouth movements, hand gestures
  32. Things that sway back and forth
  33. Protruding tongue
  34. Teeth and toothpick action
  35. Visible food in mouth
  36. Rocking chair movements
  37. Bouncing balls
  38. Biting lips
  39. Nose blowing
  40. Ceiling fans
  41. Windshield wipers
  42. Blowing bubbles
  43. Eye rolling
  44. Hair brushing
  45. Swinging keys
  46. Kissing
  47. People typing
  48. Flossing
  49. Pacing
  50. Rubbing

 




51 Comments

  1. What a great list!

    having suffered with Misophonia since age 10, I am now 71, it was a great blessing to me to find an actual name for my condition; and that others also suffer with it.

    Many of the things listed above affect me, but I would add one more. Computer screens with blinking, changing or moving areas. I’m not talking about movies that I choose to watch or the like, but those annoying “Hey, look at me-I’m more important than anything you could possibly be doing on the computer” infuriating displays of self importance; commonly known as blinking, flashing, discourteous advertisements!

    As you can tell I do have Misophonia. Thanks for your work and may God bless you with success.

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    • They have not added SNEEZING

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    • I am a young teen and I have Misokinesia; it is not something I want to have, but I can’t stop it. Sometimes when my mom is driving me somewhere I see her hands moving on the steering wheel and I put my hands in front of my eyes so that I cant see her hands, this is just one example, I mostly get this feeling of annoyance when the person is someone I’m annoyed with at that moment. Again, I am not sure whether this is Misokinesia or something else.

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      • this is exactly how i feel and i get annoyed about movement in the car as well and the annoyance develops more with people that i am annoyed with too omg i’m glad someone else relates

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      • i get the exact same thing when im watching a movie or concentrating on something and some one is standing right beside me. Ill have to tell them to move

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      • I am 14 nearly 15 and i have had misophonia since i was 8 or 9 nine and then I started to get misokinesia when i was about 12. Its absolutly terrible for me and my family to deal with. I just saw my sister rub her nose and i started to kind of rip my pants with anger quietly and ran to my room crying. As soon as i saw it say thumb sucking in the list above I physically freaked out and gave myslef a fright. Its like im trapped in my room. But having a younger sister who doesnt understand just makes it extreamly hard for me. I dont know what to do, can anyone relate or have any ideas hows to help me?

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        • Hi Amber, we are around the same age and I can most definitely relate to you. I have had misophonia since I was about 11 and I think that I have also gotten Misokinesia within the last year. I have wanted someone to talk to and relate to about misophonia for so long, so if you would like to talk more, please let me know. 🙂

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      • That is definitely what I feel. I have had so much trouble being in the car with my parents since discovering their little bad habits. My dad PICKS HIS EYEBROW and I cannot stand it. He gets so annoyed when I tell him to stop but I feel a rage inside of me when I see it. My mum does this thing where she rubs her knee in circular motions. She’s Bipolar which means she has mood switches. Therefore if I point it out it’s a trigger for her to switch instantly into rage. I know what you are feeling and it’s okay. I’m trying to replace the rage with another habit and it helps. Hahaha I carry pretzels everywhere and when I get that rage, I just have a pretzel.

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        • I used to live with a friend that had a mustached that we would twirl & twist between his fingers for hours while he watched TV. I finally had to ask him to watch TV downstairs in our spare living space. It got to the point where I was practically in tears.

          I also sit as far away from someone in a doctor or dentist office (before COVID) because I get teary and nauseous when I would see someone licking their fingers to turn a page in a magazine. Not only do I have Misokinesia but I also suffer from Misophonia. I get a double whammy. It makes my skin crawl and I get so emotional I want to run out as fast as I can. I consulted an Audiologist and I was diagnosed with Misophonia & Hyperacusis. He prescribed hearing aids called sound generators and programmed it to a specific tone that gave me a good emotional feeling. They are quite expensive, $3,500 but it was worth the investment to give me some peace of mind, peace of physical relaxation to not feel so tense. As you all know that suffer with this… there is an almost hyper-awareness we feel on some level or another (I call it being on guard) knowing someone, anyone at any time will trigger us. It’s almost as if we walk around being irritated knowing we are going to be triggered any minute. It took a couple of weeks to get used to wearing the sound generators but believe me, I don’t go home from work in tears any longer.

          Yes, I still get triggers but they have lessened. The noise generators don’t block out noise but rather filter the suddenness of noise. I wear them at work, no one can see them on me, or hear the sound from my ears, I can still carry on a conversation with a coworker and hear their responses.

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  2. having misophonia makes you want to actually hurt the person that’s making one or more of the triggering noises. You don’t really want to hurt them but that’s the type of anger that builds up inside of you. If one of your sibling’s were chewing really loud, the anger makes you want to hurt them to make them stop even though you don’t actually want to hurt them, not sure if i’m making sense

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    • Same! I feel so bad feeling that way, but it just happens. I totally understand.

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      • I ve always have a problem with the sound of spitting
        It disgusts me
        N the second sound problem i have wasnt mentioned but i dont know if im the only one who notices it
        I hate the sound of a metalic object being pushed on a ground
        It makes me feel like its being moved on ma teeth
        I have been having this reaction since i was very young n i dont know it came from

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    • There’s this kid at my school that used to use pen lids as whistles (this is in high school) and they ran around doing it everywhere and one day I snapped and kicked them in the shin and they told on me. I then started avoiding them and began hating them and my freinds tried to convince me it was just coz they told on me and I just knew that it was something else. Then I was reading a book and found out about misophonia and was so relived that I finally had an answer. I instantly message my freind that told me I just hated the kid coz they told on me like ” you know how I hate (kids name) yeah it’s because of this thing called misophonia”, then proceeded to tell them about what misophonia is. Knowing why I couldn’t stand this kid has helped me so much. (The kid doesn’t do the whistle thing any more but I still can’t stand them)

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  3. misokinesia. Thanks!! This describes what I was trying to say in the misophonia article.
    Now we have a name for being annoyed by what we see.

    Also to include in that list above, is seeing often repeated words or names.

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    • I am 59 years old and have been made fun of all my life for not being able to stay in the same room with someone kicking their leg or rocking in a chair……Always thought I was screwed up. So grateful it’s not just me. Not a single Counselor could ever help me.

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      • Hi. I am currently at risk for losing my private office at work and I am so anxious and depressed. First I have both misokenisia and misophonia. A girl at work will be such a big trigger for me. I don’t know what to do. is this consider disabilities where jobs have to make reasonable accommodations.

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  4. Since I can remember I being the oldest meant sitting next to dad during meals and they were all silent, well to everyone else. Just knowing family dinner every night was mandatory was bad enough. For me, it was constant torture from their first bite of, well, I will spare you the sounds and open mouth eating descriptions I endured until we were excused. That was only part of my issues I suffered from. Over the past 15 years I have been diagnosed with multiple different mental disorders and loaded with many psychological drugs with very little help. After finding Misophonia & Misokinesia I honestly can tie everything to them both. They are real issues that we suffer from and people ie., doctors, need to finally take this seriously.

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  5. I am so glad I stumbled onto this site. This makes me feel so much better. For years I thought I was a bad and intolerant person. My worst with misokinesia is repetative movements in my peripheral vision, especially when another person has a nervous tic or constant or people eating with mouth open or eating too fast. My major misophonia triggers are snare drums, band music and jazz. Also someone constantly coughing, sniffling, blowing nose, sneezing, loud clattering of dishes, constant chatter going nowhere, and too much repetition in a song, for example the Beatles “Hey Jude” (all the na-nas hey jude) I like the beginning of the song but when it comes to the na-nas I have to turn it off. Thanks for listening and so glad I’m not the only one and there are names for these disorders!

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  6. Why won’t you post my comment?

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  7. What about bodily sensations? For example, I have long suffered from misophonia and have met several others who find the sensation of dry feet on a dry mat or dusty dirt/sand to be intolerable.

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    • I have a similar problem – if my feet are slightly damp & I get grit or fluff or anything that is out of place, I feel repulsed… I have an indoor pair of flip-flops so I never come into contact with my (clean) hard floors… Carpets are tolerable, but only if outdoor shoes have never touched them (why would anyone wear filth from outside, indoors? 😱😱😱)

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  8. I am 75 years old and have always had to cope being around or watching someone on television chewing gum. I vividly remember it starting when I was 11 years old. I myself was chewing Juicy Fruit gum and became slightly nauseated. After that, I never did chew gum myself and was extremely uncomfortable being around people chewing gum. I wouldn’t call it a panic attack but I can better understand people who have them. Nice to know the condition has a name. It makes me feel less strange.

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  9. This is right on the button for me! I came across this site because I was so irritated by my colleague huffing, mumbling and stroking his face. Has always bothered me, think it stems from my childhood with a anxious and depressed Mum. She ground her teeth, huffed and puffed, shuffled the newspaper etc.
    It makes me really on edge and angry. Eating of apples really is really annoying. I also have an issue with badly placqued teeth. I had to stop volunteering with Down syndrome adults because of it. Makes you feel like you are bad person, so glad it is becoming recognised.

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  10. It’s good to know that people out there also suffer from misophonia and im not alone. I also have other visual triggers such as blinking continuously or making any type of eye movement (not pupil) such as moving ur brows that causes the eyes to open more and look sort of creepy at night.

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  11. I’m surprised not to see on the Top 50 list one of mine that presents itself a lot: people using their fingers to scroll through content on their phones!

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    • OMG! I totally never realized that watching my roommate scroll thru her phone was a trigger!! Her fingers stays in this crooked position, and only her finger moves! It grosses me out!

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  12. In addition to misophonia and misokinesia, is there also a term for negative feelings triggered by certain types of touch?

    I have misophonia, but in addition, experience similar feelings of annoyance and anger when touched too lightly. When my partner touches me too lightly, it drives me crazy–I instantly feel angry and have to bite my tongue and/or leave the room to avoid unloading on him. I was the same way with my mom, but not as much with other people.

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    • I have this too! I suffer from all forms of hyper sensitivity (touch, sight, smell, sounds, and taste) and I honestly thought it was all in my head. Especially because it’s not consistent. I can be touched by some people, but not others. And it’s usually the ones I’m closest to that can’t touch me. I feel horrible because I physically flinch when when touched and it makes my loved one feel bad. But I literally can’t help it.

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      • Anita, OMG–I’m so glad to hear that someone else has this touch sensitivity, and that it’s to the people closest to you. You are describing my situation exactly. Does anyone know if there is a term for it?

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    • I’ve been feeling like a total nut lately because of this exact thing! I can not, CAN NOT, stand light touches. They seem all sweet and kind and romantic or whatever but it drives me up the wall! Like, either just do it normally or not at all. It makes me so irrationally mad, and I thought I was just being an over sensitive involuntary asshole. It makes my mom so upset when I ask her not to touch me and I feel really bad but it can’t be helped.

      More so, I find that yeah, it’s the people I’m closest to that I have the most trouble tolerating when it comes to touch, sadly. I wish I could be any other way because it hurts others around me.

      Ugh, I’m just glad I’m not crazy and not alone in this.

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    • Oh my, I thought it was just my relationship going down the tube. (I too have had misophonia since I was very young. My triggers are mostly gum chewing, purposely loud yawning/yelling while sneezing, and people rubbing their shoes on carpet.) For the last 2 year I have been triggered by being touched very lightly. My partner does this thing I call “tweaking” where he barely runs his fingertips all over my body, especially when I am falling asleep. I absolutely hate it, completely enrages me and makes me ruminate on everything that he has done that has ever pissed me off…… and I wish he would just touch me. I have tried to show him that I don’t like that, but he doesn’t seem to get it.

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    • Sounds like a tactile sensitivity.

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  13. I’m 53 & after years of being berated for misophonia I’m so pleased I know about it.
    I can’t bear the sound of screaming, shrieking kids…… I want to punch them really hard, just to stop it…..of course I never would, I’m a pacifist vegetarian….but noise cancelling headphones have saved my life….the visual triggers I can avert my eyes…

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    • Hi Lily ,,,, I do have other sound problems. Currently I have to keep earphones continuously to avoid listening to some sounds in office and at home too. Will it be a problem using earphones throughout …. I tried using earplugs used for swimming sometimes. Sometimes i feel pain in the ear because of it. any advise please.

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  14. Several years ago, when going through a battery of medical tests, while examining my ears, the doctor abruptly stopped and said, “you hear like a dog, don’t you”? Of course I perked up and wondered how in the world he could determine that by looking in my ear. He said that the cochlea in my inner ear was wound tighter than anyone’s he’d ever seen.
    I can’t remember when I haven’t been affected by noise. I experience almost all of the symptoms you’ve listed. As a child, I can recall being on the opposite end of the house and yelling for my dad to stop clanking his cereal bowl. My brother and I shared a bedroom and I would turn on the aquarium pump next to my bed to drown out the noise of him twitching his toes. I catch myself mimicking repetitive words, such as, “it’s like”, or muting the TV when one of the pharmaceutical ads goes on and on about the 1000 side effects their medication could cause. On AMC movie channel an ad or their logo pops up in the lower right hand corner of the screen and stays there during the entire movie, so I just cover one of my eyes or change the channel, even if it’s something I really want to watch. If someone’s making a movement (practically any movement) while we’re watching a movie, I position a pillow on my leg to visually obstruct my view. I literally have to run out of the kitchen when dishes are being put away, unless of course I’m the one putting them away. I always chide my wife for turning on the car blinkers when she’s already in a designated turn lane, or I’ll ask her to turn them off until she’s actually ready to make the turn. I have to take 1/4 of a Xanax before I go to a restaurant, church, or when family is coming over. My anxiety goes out of the roof just anticipating the noise people are going to be making. Any sharp or sudden sound makes me jerk as an involuntary reaction, something my kids and even my wife think I’m doing to be dramatic. Sadly, my wife’s voice is a trigger as well. When we’re with friends, I try to signal her to turn her volume down and that just makes her angry…one of my signals when we’re out to dinner with friends is to gently touch her leg, which to me is reasonable. To me, that’s a reasonable way to let her know but to her, it makes her feel like she can’t be herself, laughing and cutting up with friends. Aside from avoiding as many social interactions as I can and taking a bit of Xanax, I will leave a noisy room and wait as long as I can before I do the obligatory reappearance, or I will lean my head on my fist to discretely plug one of my ears. My heart races, I get angry, I will literally run out of a noisy room, I try to position myself at the dinner table so that I’m not sitting next to someone who talks too loud, smacks, shakes their leg, picks their teeth, scrapes their soup bowl until there’s no visible evidence that there was ever any soup in the bowl, and on and on. My mother talks in a child-like voice, so I’m constantly spinning the conversation so that someone else will be drawn in to interject comments. Whistling is another one that really sends me spinning. I think I could be a poster child for Mesophonia 🙂
    Unfortunately, I’ve made the mistake of sharing my “condition” with a few people and of course their reactions/responses are exactly the ones you’ve listed, the worst being their exaggerated reenactment of the noise or motion I hate and then say, “Oh…you mean like this?” I don’t talk about it much because I don’t want to give in to it and enable myself to a life of complete disassociation with people, especially my family. I try to control as much of my environment as possible, distance myself and even run from trigger people, take Xanax, bite my tongue, swear like crazy in my head, and pray a lot. At least now that I know it’s a real condition, I feel validated to actually have a label attached to my quirkiness.

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    • My ears have gotten so sensitive since having my third baby. I find myself using high quality earplugs on several occasions – to dampen the happy sounds of my playing children! They have been super helpful (but then, after a while, they get uncomfortable… So it’s whatever is the lesser of 2 evils at that time). This oversensitivity has the potential to make me very horrible, but I fight to curb it. (on a very personal note, prayer & praise – being in the right-standing with God makes me a more patient & gentle person – its a daily effort though, but we are called to repent daily of the things that run us to ruin. By the grace of God go I).

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    • I’m on these forums and pages a lot when I have a particular bad bout of rage and panic at a certain trigger, and this is one of those times. And I always read personal experiences and I’m like yeah omg that’s me, but sometimes I find some comments that are so incredibly similar to how I’ve lived my life I wonder if it wasn’t me from the future who posted it. Your comment is one of those ones.

      Foot twitching and toe wiggling is possibly my biggest peeve in the world (might be because my dad does it non stop) and it makes me so LIVID that I find myself becoming a rage monster at times and I have to leave the room immediately before I do something or say something bad. My parents say its ridiculous that I balance a pillow on my leg to block the visual of someone’s feet but it’s a necessity if I am to stay in the room. I do that same tactic and I’m glad it’s not just me. And its times where I feel so helpless and unable to do anything is when I’ve blocked the view, but I can still hear the movement of the feet. It drives me CRAZY and I feel so mad and anxious and helpless its horrible. Once during a test a girl behind me kept swinging her feet and I couldn’t concentrate on anything except that as if the whole world narrowed down to only that swinging motion and the harder I tried to ignore it the more the world narrowed and my anger increased. I spent the rest of the class with my one eye closed to avoid seeing it.

      Another thing I’ve never heard someone mention is the TV label on the screen. If it pops up and stays there I have to change channels. It’s ridiculous, I know, but its just annoying.

      A lot of it for me is peripheral vision stuff. Like if I can see movement or a figure out of the corner of my eye I get so anxious. My family comments on my unusually wide peripheral vision because I can see things that are partially behind my head too and they’re astounded that I can see it.

      Another trigger for me isn’t even movement but this thing people do when they’re sitting and they throw an arm over the back of the couch, hang there arm over the couch, or lean back on their hands when sitting on the ground. For some reason, it makes me furious and I can’t stand it. I have to ask them to lower their arm/hand, or if I don’t know them well I just have to shift to try and not see it.

      At the dinner table my mum is always always the last one left eating and it annoys me a lot. I can bear the sound of people eating if I’m eating at the same time, but when everyone has stopped and there’s still that one person who keeps munching… it drives me mad. Plus, my mom is the type of person who eats the weird cartilage thing on chicken drumsticks and she always eats them last so when everyone is done all you can hear is her crunching that cartilage loudly and then talking while she eats! It’s unbearable and there’s nothing I can do except hold back the beast.

      I feel so bad that me lashing out always lands on the people closest to me, because it makes it seem like I’m pissed off by their existence and I hate them but I’m not and I don’t and I need to remind myself that its not their fault, they’re just living, it’s mine for reacting in this way. But whenever I mention it my family just rolls their eyes and calls me over-sensitive and bitchy and I don’t know how to explain that I’m trying so hard to ignore these things and it’s not for attention or to be prissy.
      I’m just glad I’m not alone 🙂 Thank you for sharing your experience, it really helped me!

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  15. You are correct…. it makes me think to hurt the person ….. it is very unfortunate that the mind directs that way. It takes lot of thinking to divert myself from that thought and I feel very sorry for my state of mind

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  16. For the longest time I’ve had misophonia and I still definitely do! It’s any eating sound known to man!! Lol but just recently, at least the last 5 years I’ve started feeling irritated SEEING people eat! Whether it’s family, friends, tv, movies etc I can’t watch if I see chewing! Taking bites of burgers, seeing people cut their food etc! Glad to know it has a name too but I need help! Lol

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  17. I am 11 and I have this condition I completely get where you are coming from I don’t want to get into too much gory detail but I feel like I want to squash them do you have any stragities to help me some of my triggers are finger wiggling and chewing with your mouth open.

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  18. Thank you! I’m not alone. For me, somebody humming is perhaps the worst sound I can hear

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  19. You are making total sense, I get that feeling when someone is moving their hands in a twitching way, or just fidgeting with something. Even when I watch someone I’m annoyed with talk.

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  20. I cannot abide watching someone licking an ice cream cone. I really don’t want or need to see anyone’s tongue.

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  21. And I thought it was just me!
    It is a relief to find out that there is a name for this condition and that I am not alone. I’m tormented by both visual and audio triggers. Finger twiddling, ear picking, nail picking, hiccups, coin jangling, drumming at football matches on tv; the list goes on and on. Even the sight of a particular person putting a cup to his mouth seems to give me a bout of Tourette’s.
    Help!!!

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    • I have a pet hate for seeing someone using boardmarkers on paper! It disturbs me by sight, sound and feeling.
      Sometimes it’s alright, sometimes I even do it myself, but sometimes it gets horribly annoying. I don’t know if it’s misophonia, misokinesia, or else; but the core of the bother is the ‘touch’ between the cloth on marker’s tip, and the paper. It’s rather tactile than visual.

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  22. My brother fidgets with his feet all the time and it makes me want to hit him on the foot with a cement brick, just so he stops! Do I have this “Misokinesia” thing? I think I might have Misophonia as well, and I hate the sound of him sniffling, and again, fidgeting with his feet. Just saying this makes me wanna find a brick and hit my head with it.

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  23. I struggle with both misophonia and misokinesia. It’s so bad that I can hardly even let my family turn on the radio, they can’t shake their feet or have the ceiling fan on. So many little things fill me with anger and rage, and it makes me want to cry when my family responds “oh you’re fine”, or “just deal with it”. Because mentally, it’s a massive struggle and I can’t just deal with it. It makes me want to stay in my room more, it makes me not enjoy being around other ppl. I mean really, if I’m around someone I don’t know very well and they’re tapping their finger or something, I’m not going to ask them to stop. I just suffer silently And do my best to remove myself from the situation. Anyone else get chills just thinking about your triggers? I’m so happy to know I’m not alone in feeling the way I do. My family thought I was crazy and only wanted to control them more. But that’s not what it is. And they can’t understand at all, and it makes us all quite angry.

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  24. I don’t know if this counts or something, but you know when you’re typing and you stop? And then you just see the blinking of the line waiting for you to type something? Well, it really makes me upset and emotional and I don’t know what to do. Every time I want to stop typing, I have to highlight something so it stops! Is there any way to help?? It’s driving me insane. 🙁

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  25. Has anyone tried anything that has helped them cope with the visual triggers?

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  26. I have a gardener that mows the lawn right on the other side of my bedroom wall at about 8am when I’d still be asleep and I’d visualise myself hurting him. I’d grunt and be so frustrated, it usually spoils my whole day. When I get disturbed by loud banging noises I’ll immediately feel anxious and worry that something will come get me from behind? Not sure what this condition is, it’s similar to paranoia but not quite.
    Either way, I’m relieved to have found the medical term for my irritability toward noises, I thought I was going insane.

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  27. I’m almost 30 now and I have Misokinesia from when I was 12. I have it mostly with my mom. I can’t be next to her for too long without cringing. Everything she does triggers me. when she licks a ices or when she’s spacy.. the worst is when she tickles herself. When I see her tickling herself it can take weeks and months for me to calm down…

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