The Symptoms & Triggers of Misophonia

The literal definition of misophonia is hatred of sound but a person with misophonia does not simply hate all sound. People with misophonia have specific symptoms and triggers and are sensitive to only certain sounds (and occasionally to visual triggers). Any sound can become a problem to a person with misophonia but most are some kind of background noise. People call the collection of sounds that they’re sensitive to their trigger set. It is possible to add to one’s trigger set over time.

Exposure to a trigger sound elicits an immediate negative emotional response from a person with sound sensitivities. The response can range from moderate discomfort to acute annoyance or go all the way up to full-fledged rage and panic. Fight or flight reactions can occur. While experiencing a trigger event, a person may become agitated, defensive or offensive, distance themselves from the trigger or possibly act out in some manner.

People with misophonia are aware that the sounds that trigger them don’t bother other people.

The sound of fingernails on a chalkboard is unpleasant to many people. But this is a very mild example of what people with misophonia experience when exposed to a trigger sound. It lacks the intensity a misophonia sufferer experiences and doesn’t have the strong negative emotional component. Not liking something (even if very strongly) is unlikely to cause a person to feel like lashing out at the source of the offending sound nor will it result in producing an actual fight or flight reflex.

The people closest to the person with misophonia often elicit the worst triggers. This can make personal relationships difficult and stressful. An environment known to include trigger sounds can limit social activities when a person with misophonia anticipates a problem. In some cases, a person with misophonia can become socially isolated and pull back from family and friends in an attempt to reduce the associated physical symptoms that they experience when triggered (tension, headache, tightening jaw, stomach issues, etc.).

the sound triggers of misophonia vary greatly

A person with misophonia does not always have any control over the work environment. A coworker munching on food may be too distracting or could produce a full-fledged panic attack. An environment that will not or cannot accommodate the needs of a sound sensitive person can result in anxiety for the person with misophonia and challenges for supervisory staff. At times, the sound environment can be enough of a problem to make keeping the job intolerable. A school environment can be similar; having a long-term negative impact if it interferes with the ability to learn or socialize.

When exposed to a trigger sound, some people feel the need to mimic what they hear. Mimicry is an automatic, non-conscious social phenomenon. It can have a calming effect and make the situation feel better to the person experiencing stress. There is a biological basis for how mimicry lessens adverse reactions to triggers because it evokes compassion and empathy.

People with misophonia can be reluctant to share their symptoms and triggers with others because sharing can have several different outcomes. Reports from sufferers indicate that sometimes people purposefully mock them with offending noises (at times exaggerating them as well). Also, sometimes family, friends, co-workers and others minimize the problem. A person with misophonia is sometimes told to “just try to ignore that sound,” or “you’re just being difficult,” or “don’t let it get to you.” Suggestions like these are not helpful. And people with misophonia often say that if they could simply choose to ignore their triggers, they would have made that choice a long time ago.

On the other hand, there are those who are supportive and offer encouragement. Anyone with a problem or difficulty appreciates a helping hand now and then. If you know someone with misophonia and want to help them cope with the disorder, all you need to do is ask what you can do to help.

List of common triggers

Please note, some people find that reading about triggers has the potential to make them take on new triggers. Some people also avoid hearing or imagining sample trigger sounds for the same reason. If you think that learning about new trigger sounds could in any way be a problem for you, then there’s no need to read the lists below.

Mouth and Eating: “ahhs” after drinking, burping, chewing, crunching (ice or other hard food), gulping, gum chewing and popping, kissing sounds, nail biting, silverware scraping teeth or a plate, slurping, sipping, licking, smacking, spitting, sucking (ice, etc), swallowing, talking with food in mouth, tooth brushing, flossing, tooth sucking, lip smacking, wet mouth sounds, grinding teeth, throat clearing and jaw clicking.

Breathing/Nasal: grunting, groaning, screaming, loud or soft breathing, sniffling, snorting, snoring, sneezing, loud or soft talking, raspy voices, congested breathing, hiccups, yawning, nose whistling and wheezing.

Vocal: humming, muffled talking, nasally voices, overused words such as um or ah (repeated words), sibilant sounds (S, P, T, CH, K, B sounds), singing, gravelly voices, bad singing, soft whisper-like voices and whistling.

Environmental: clicking from texting, keyboard/mouse, TV remote, pen clicking, writing sounds, papers rustling/ripping, ticking clocks, texting and cell phone ringtone.

Utensils/metals: dishes clattering, fork scraping teeth, silverware hitting plates or other silverware and rattling change in pockets.

Plastic: water bottle squeezing/crinkling, breaking hard plastic and bouncing balls.

Wrappers: plastic bags crinkling/rustling, plastic bags opening or being rubbed and crinkling food packages.

Cars: sitting idling for long periods of time, beep when car is locked, car doors slamming, keys banging against steering column and turn signal clicking.

Heavy equipment: lawnmowers, leaf blower, air conditioners and chain saws.

Impact sounds: other people’s voices, muffled bass music or TV through walls, doors/windows being slammed and basketball thumps.

Animal noises: dogs barking, bird sounds, crickets, frogs, dogs or cats licking, drinking, slurping, eating, whining, dogs scratching themselves and trying to bite their fleas and claws tapping.

Baby: Baby crying, babbling, adults using baby talk and kids yelling.

TV: loud TV or radio.

Body Movement related: Foot shuffling (dry feet on floor/carpet) or tapping, finger snapping, foot dragging, heels, flip flops, knuckle/joint cracking, eye blinking, nail biting and clipping, eating, chewing, fidgeting, hair twirling, movements out of the corner of eyes, repetitive foot or body movements, jaw chewing/movement.

60 Comments

  1. hannah

    I’m so have this!!!! How do I approach my new Psychiatrist with this?

    Reply
    • Hannah

      Does anyone take any anti anxiety meds for this? If so may o please ask what one?

      Reply
      • ariana

        yeah i found online you can use lyrica, but im not a doctor. i have misphonia too, and am considering going to one. it has a lot of side effects apparently, so idk if its safe

        Reply
        • Phyllys

          Please don’t take Lyrica the side effects are worse than the disorder and you could become addicted

          Reply
      • Julie

        Lyrica Valium and serequel to sleep

        Reply
  2. Randall Miller

    This can be a problem for someone who has this disorder, however it can be even worse for those who have to live with them. I seldom see my brother because nearly every sound in the world “drives him crazy.”

    Reply
    • Lacey

      As someone who has this, I’m sure it is worse for your brother. You truly cannot understand the way these sounds affect us. I can’t even explain what some noises do to my brain. I can’t even eat at the table with my family because mine is so bad.

      Reply
      • Naomi Ashley

        I am the same way and I hate it . My mom is the worst especially and I don’t know why . I try my best not to bring to much attention to myself but I just go crazy sometimes

        Reply
      • Sarah

        I know exactly how you feel. My family tell me to ignore it or cope with it but that is not how it works. It just drives me insane and I feel the need to cry or scream every time I hear chewing or heavy breathing or satisfied eating sounds.

        Reply
        • Danielle

          DO NOT try to endure the triggers. From experience I can say it’s better to throw a tantrum then to bottle it up, otherwise, you risk getting more triggers.

          Reply
      • Cindi

        Me either and it is getting worse as i get older!

        Reply
    • shelley

      Yes, you can take anxiety meds for this. Celexa is a good one.

      Reply
      • shelley

        The celexa does not help all of it but it calms your nerves a little. Most noises on the list (the noises that just don’t HAVE to be there, you know) all bother me.

        Reply
    • ariana

      same!! i dont know what to do anymore!! how do you get through it? i mean some days i dont even wanna wake up anymore

      Reply
    • Nicole

      I don’t think you not seeing your brother as much as you’d like is worse than him having to live in such stress and pain all the time. From one misophonia sufferer to a normal person, believe me. It. Isn’t. Worse. Js.

      Reply
  3. Dranna

    This is me. I try to keep my reactions to these triggers calm but sometimes it’s too much to handle. People just tend to think that you’re a jerk for being annoyed all of the time.

    Reply
  4. Wendy

    My husband thinks I am nuts, the sound of a radio playing makes me want to smash it or someone. Makes me extremely angry. It is good to know that I am not alone in this.

    Reply
    • Deanna

      OMG YES! I literally told the psychiatrist I feel like I get violently angry at certain noises! I have Meniere’s Disease as well, so it’s like a double whammy!

      Reply
  5. Helpless

    The sounds my sister make drive me crazy! It’s ruining my relationship with her, and I don’t know what to do. Sounds of coughing, excessive sniffling make me want to punch a wall! HELP.

    Reply
    • Nicola

      You poor thing, I had the same with my sister, we never got to point where it doesn’t affect me even as adults. However, I started getting the same reactions with my husband and told him about it and what it is, since then he’s tried really hard not to make noises that upset me bless him and I can eat right beside him anytime now and not react so much to accidental noises. Wish you all the best xx

      Reply
    • Tay

      When I was younger, my sound sensitivity was towards my brother– mostly when he would blow on hot food? He made noise when he blew air out and it enraged me. I haven’t lived with him in five years, though, so that hasn’t been an issue.
      Since then, it’s been water running when it doesn’t absolutely have to (i.e. If you’re doing the dishes, I NEED you to turn the water off if you’re turned away. Even for a second.)
      My boyfriend is a twitch streamer, and his audio set up requires him to be a little louder than normal conversations (not to mention he has bulky headphones on, so he’s louder just so he can hear himself) if I’m high-anxiety or stressed out (or sometimes even when I’m not,) the loudness of his voice irritates me and sends me into fight or flight mode.
      I have to leave the room. This is awful.

      Reply
  6. Anonymous

    Never knew this was a phycological disorder. I only ever thought people were just being rude and never grew up with table manors or didn’t realize they was being loud. I have felt like this since I was in my early teens. I’ve had these feelings of those around me chewing, chomping, snoring, breathing loudand ruffling bags. It annoys me so much and drives me to get angered easily and I have always found it to be very offensive.

    Reply
  7. lindsay

    Its related to obsessive compulsive disorder. Look up CBT therapy. Ive been dealing with this disorder since I was 9. Now im 33 and hate pretty much every noise that was listed above. I reached out to a therapist who specialized in misophonia and he also specialized in anxiety and OCD. The more we explored my issue the more sense it made and I stopped feeling like a crazy person. It will never go away so in the meantime its ear buds or earplugs.

    Reply
    • Jennifer

      Thank you for this information. I’m 37 and never received help. My daughter, who is 9, suffers the same. I will have to get us help.

      Reply
  8. Denise

    I have taken the misophonia test and I have 98% of the triggers listed above. My earliest trigger was about the age of four. I HATE having this and right now I’m in a very small office with three other people. My co-worker knows of my issue, feels it’s my issue and not hers. Her total lack of disrespect for me (she pops her gum) is amazing to me. She raises my blood pressure every day. I use earplugs underneath earphones. I have to take the earphones off when the boss comes in. Misophonia is an invisible disability and I’m looking to go out on disability. I’m sick of this!

    Reply
    • Sandy

      I had to go on disablity. My anger was getting so bad at work I was thinking about hurting these people that whistled or popped their gum or just swallow. I was so young with this started I can’t ever remember not having it. I was never taught to chew with my mouth closed cause all of my family are like pigs in a hog pen. I never ate at the dinner table with them and I was 5 when I remember the first time I ask them not to chew with their mouth open. Bad mistake, they all started doing it on purpose. If I wasn’t so little I probably would have committed murder at the age of 5. So when I go to my parents house and everyone is there I just act like I have stomach cramps and go sit in the bathroom when they are eating or I would go sicko on them or would just walk out. So I know it is a disease because I wasn’t taught to have eating manners that’s for sure. And I never ate with my mouth open and thought it was discusting. I have been so irritable lately and seems like hubby is swallowing louder now. Omg! I want to pop him in the Adams Apple! lol. And he uses an ecig and I can hear that damn sucking air sounds everytime he enhalls. Then if the wick needs changed it sounds like him slurping a soda. He is going to push me off the edge real soon. And he knows it, if looks could kill. Lol I hate this feeling it don’t get any better but as we get older we learn to excuse ourself some how to avoid a confirtarion. I have a lot of diarea. Lol. It works so I will keep using it as an excuse or someone calls 911 on me thinking I feel In the commode. Lol. But If these damn people ate like civil human being and not pop their gum or I could go on and on as you all know. Who raised these people to be such slobs to pop their gum like a whore on a street trying to pic up a John. Just right down discusting to hear or even see someone doing it. I want to pop them while they pop their gum. Crazy that’s my middle name.

      Reply
  9. Beca

    I definitely have misophonia. My trigger sounds are snoring, breathing (or any other sounds made when you’re sleeping…), coughing, and wet mouth sounds. I also can’t stand it when my fiance rubs his beard while we are watching TV. I always smack his hand and yell at him. Five minutes later, he’s doing it again!

    Any sort of noise while I am trying to sleep, other than white noise, is torture. I sleep with a box fan and earplugs, and I can STILL hear everything around me.

    When I was really little, I didn’t know how to handle it, and I would just cry and scream if I was triggered. As a teen, I would scratch at my chest until it bled. As an adult, I can control my reactions a lot better, but it’s still torturous to hear my trigger sounds. Instead of crying or scratching, I’ll move away or put earphones in or something.

    The woman who sits in the cubicle in front of me at work had a wet, hacking cough for months…and it used to make me want to just throw up every time she coughed.

    Reply
  10. Deanna

    I just came upon this when I was looking up the word misophonia. I hate hate hate the sound of a bag crinkling, like when my husband rolls a bag back up or opens one!! I also hate and can’t even be around anyone that “slurps”, I literally have to leave the room… I thought it was just me!

    Reply
    • Ginnene Larrabee

      Bags and wrappers are the worst for me.
      Halloween was the worst when my kids were little.
      I didn’t know it was a thing. They just thought I was crazy.

      Reply
  11. Kay

    I’m sorry other people have this too, but at the same time I’m relieved I’m
    not alone. I get so upset and no one understands, they think I’m over reacting this has bothered me since I was a teenager and I’m now in my forties. I can’t stand the sounds of people/animals eating or any other mouth noises. I try to avoid these things as best as I can as they have driven me into a rage.

    Reply
  12. Carrie

    I’m confident that my husband is misophonic but I have no idea of how to approach talking about it when he currently believes that my sniffling, hair playing, nail biting, “noisy” eating (etc) are my problems to fix. He knows that he’s hypersensitive to these sounds and that I don’t hear/notice them but my lack of notice is irrelevant. What should I do?

    Reply
    • Nicole

      Yall need to work together to find a solution that benefits both of you. I would approach him at a time when you wont be triggering him. Like, after you’ve cut your nail really short, aren’t eating or having allergies, and of course without playing with your hair. Let him know you’re not perfect, but you’ll try to be careful for him because you care. See if he suggests any thing and go from there 🙂 hope it helped!

      Reply
  13. lauren

    I have it bad with the vocal, breathing, and the mouth and eating sections. my mom does all of it constantly and it makes me insane, I have no idea what to do to prevent it

    Reply
  14. Anonyomous

    I sit in a “cube farm” surrounded closely by three other co-workers; one yawns loudly ALL DAY, one is constantly coughing and clearing their throat, and one whistles regularly. If I did not have some really good head phones I would be in the nut house by now!
    Then, when I go home you would think I could relax there, but no! There are screaming loud birds and when they make noise I feel like I am going to have a heart attack. Consequently, I spend most of my time with my earbuds on listening to music. Loud music does not bother me because I am controlling it and know what to expect, it is the unexpected, loud, irritating noises that drive me up the wall. Even my cute little rescue dog licking and biting his fur is almost unbearable!!
    I wish none of us had to go through this, but glad to know that I am not the only one.

    Reply
  15. Nick

    Anytime I hear a plastic spatula scratching against a metal pan (for example), all of a sudden I just have to act out. My head often hurts for a bit and I shiver, even just thinking about the sound. I am 12 and have been like this as long as I can remember. Do you think it is misophonia?

    Reply
  16. Tiffany

    I thought I was just an a-hole my whole life b/c of the way certain sounds ( chomping,scrapping food off plates and really all lip/eating noises) elicited such feelings of rage. I hate that I cant just ignore it and i’m sure my family hates it too!

    Reply
  17. Naomi Ashley

    I really did think I was alone. I recently discovered my condition and it really sucks. I didnt know this was an actual thing until I did more research about it. I told my parents about it and they think it’s just funny. They smack in my ear on purpose and they don’t understand that it’s like I’m going into a rage . I really need Help and I want some type of treatment because I don’t wanna be like this forever. I’m only 15 and I want to be normal without having to be enraged by the sounds that I hear daily!!

    Reply
    • C

      You should forward this article to your family. I just discovered this condition and I am 43. I have had this since I was a small child and have figured out ways to avoid a lot of my triggers so don’t despair! The biggest one for me is being at the dinner table with people. At my own home I always turn on the radio that sits in a corner just behind me. I play a local jazz station which seems to be a happy medium for anyone joining for dinner. When I go to my in laws for dinner though it is literal torture just to get through it. My father in law swishes water through his teeth to remove food and does pig snorts in addition to the sounds of chewing, etc. that regularly bother me.
      Finding this article makes me feel better knowing that I’m not just a sensitive jerk but going through the list and seeing that most of the sounds affect me is also disconcerting. I hope it relieves the steam in my head and doesn’t add to it. The tricky thing is that my five year old daughter is already showing signs herself.
      My poor husband….

      Reply
    • Nic

      I’m really sorry your parents don’t understand your issue. Hang in there. My husband has always been sensitive to sounds like tapping or rattles in the car. Whilst trying to be sensitive to his needs we have always thought it a bit humorous. We will be more understanding know that we know how painful this is to him. Our son is very sensitive to the sound of chewing food, especially my husband eating apples! He told me once it made him feel like he wanted to kill his father. Ever since I have tried to protect him from these situations.

      Reply
  18. MoniQue

    Thank yyu for this article. My daughter goes crazy with raw food especially raw carrot munching. I never understood it till now. She munches crunchy fruit like crispy pears as soothers. She gets triggers from key pad or something…
    I would like to help her. Is there any herbal help? It is psychotic?

    Reply
    • Lee

      I have a few things that bother me, but not sure whether it’s misphonia or just sensitive hearing, because I normally hear things others don’t like the alarm clock power supply buzzing, or light bulb buzzing, or that noise in the background of the car, it’s only when my kids slap there mouths together when chewing there food does it bother me, but is it in the mind or just manners?

      What I will say though, a few years ago I suffered a massive problem with food and couldn’t eat anything. It wasn’t until several stones of weight loss, blood tests all normal and a lot of research on the web that I found out about GAPS syndrome.

      Anyway, From my experience before any of these things happened and my problem with eating the book I got about GAPS with one recipe, liver, onion, garlic and a good dollop of butter fried up was my road for recovery and like a god send. I craved it.
      What am I getting at, the food we eat could well be the cause of a lot of our health problems. Bread is one of those things that makes me feel worse and get much more agitated and having the sounds become more pronounced and my feelings towards my kids becoming harsher when chewing there food causing me to leave the room before I shout at them, which is something I don’t want to do.

      I would never go on medication for these kinds of things but look at the medicine our bodies eat everyday, the food we eat. You would be surprised at what a change in your life it could make and the GAPS book could well be a start in the right direction.

      I know what I’m saying may sound strange for some as its not coming from a doctor, but when I had no success for my anxiety, panic attacks and stress from the doctor this book saved my life because I was in that bad of a shape.

      I hope what I’ve written helps and hope you have some success too.

      Reply
  19. Jennifer

    My office mate and good friend gave me the “just don’t let it get to you” and “just ignore it” advice. It is so hard to get people to understand what it’s like. Then, IT HIT ME!!! My coworker and friend has severe allergies. I told her to think of my misophonia as an allergy to “eating” noises. Telling her to not let her allergies get to her, or to just ignore her allergies is ridiculous. Once I put it to her that way, she got it! “An allergy to certain sounds” is a good description for those who will never get it.

    Reply
  20. TS

    The sound of people chewing outrages me. I felt my blood boiling as my sister sat next to me curnching on a bag of Doritos. When my son eats, I feel as though the sounds he make are magnified and I sometimes have to leave the dining room when we’re eating as a family. I hate the sound of air conditioner and muffled voices. I have to take deep breaths when these noises are present so as not to react to them. I hate to hear someone gasping while eating because they think their food tastes so good. The ahs and smacking are enough to make me cry.

    Reply
  21. Tracy

    I, too, thought I was alone in this. My triggers are more environmental. Although I am highly annoyed by mouth noises such as smacking lips while chewing and popping gum, rhythmic sounds like turn signals, clocks ticking, dripping faucets, finger tapping, or a car rattle while driving send me over the top. I have to make them stop immediately. A fan is needed at bedtime to drown out most noises, too. I have a white noise app on my phone in case we travel somewhere that has no box fan to help me sleep.

    Reply
    • Laura

      I have all of these triggers also, the fan trick I also use, I always bring one with me when I travel, try headphones with music that does not bug you, it has seemed to help me a bit when I am at my peak of anxiety.

      Reply
  22. Denise

    Oh my goodness! This is a real thing! When I was little my doctor told my parents to take me to noisy places so that I would get used to noise. Still hate it. Drives me crazy. My office has now changed to a Open Office Concept. Oh, it is awful. I looked into noise canceling headphones, but they all play music or something to drown out the noise. That’s no help. Talk, talk, talk, phones ringing, keyboards tapping, people chewing, on an on . I thought I was being too sensitive. I use earplugs sometimes. I am so relieved to know this is a real thing. Yes, I have to sleep with my fan on, too. My neighbor has a clock that chimes every hour. And, either my house is haunted, or I can hear them talking as well. Oh, to be locked in a quite room, with no sounds. That is my wish.

    Reply
  23. Karen Kennard

    The worst problem I have is with birds, can’t stand all the repetative chirping., commercial ads for all of these drugs over and over again, and the television in the living room when I am in the kitchen. I already take an anxiety pill, and it don’t help this problem !!

    Reply
  24. Ludo

    Everyone thinks I am nuts and a bad person, I am not hearing the sounds at extreme volumes, they just trigger instant brutality and anger, for me is very difficult to control, my attention is focused so fast into the sounds, I can’t think something else while being bothered by this. Quiet ,natural sounding spots are my fascination, All unnecessary sound feels like an aggression to me. I am glad, I am not totally a jerk.

    Reply
  25. Laura

    Misophonia has been a part of my life forever, ruined many relationships, pushed people away, and made people think I am literally crazy. My triggers range from the letters s, c, t, and f, along with chewing/chomping sounds, repetitive noises (people itching, typing, tapping), whistling, humming, slow movements (people wiggling their fingers, toes, twirling their hair). I have visual and audio misophonia, even when I explain my disease to people they look at me like I am crazy, they do not understand, and they continue to chomp away, whisper with their s’s, and bring me into a full on panic. I seem to focus on the sounds, then get more angry as I cannot seem to get my mind off of them, I get almost a tickley feeling in my tummy, I mimic people, and then I have to leave or look away. This disease has haunted me my entire life, and has been slowly ruining me, everything I try to do to control it does not seem to work. My anxiety is out of control, and I do not know how to control this, I am 22, someone please help.

    Reply
  26. C

    I find it interesting that most posters are female. Is there anything to this?

    One other noise that I have always joked is my least favorite noise in the world is a woman digging through her purse. Ugh.

    One suggestion that has helped me tremendously is meditation. I’m currently using a guided meditation app that tells you to focus in on the sounds around you. This has been really helpful since sounds in the past have distracted me so much from being able to meditate fully.

    Reply
  27. Steve

    I don’t eat at the dinner table any longer. I snap at both kids frequently for chewing loudly (with or without their mouths open.) I leave the office and walk down the hall when coworkers break out the chips. If I can’t leave my desk I find myself doing anything I can to avoid hearing that next chomp (knocking on table, covering ears, tapping my feet loudly.) It is crazy – after the first loud chewing sound, it is like my auditory system develops super human power and focuses/zones in on the source of the problem and the sound just gets louder and louder (i get images of being in that person’s mouth while they are chewing.) I hate how I act around those close to me. Attempts to just go with the flow, deal with it and “turn a deaf ear” just don’t work. It isn’t like I am totally debilitated by this, life goes on, but those moments are seriously intense…….

    Reply
  28. Michael Slaton

    I work with people with brain injuries that repeat themselves a a lot so I thought it was brought by my work until I read this. I remember being a kid and my mom would eat cereal and every time she would clink the spoon into the bowl. It drove me so crazy. > could hear it all over house. Now I take her to Doctor appointments and she will eat crackers. She sucks her teeth the Entire Time and I want to throw her Out window. It’s a 90 mile trip to doctor. The one trigger I saw on list that is me 100% is car doors slamming. I have a neighbor that is in and out of car 20 times a night. That car door slamming makes me curse every time. Now I see after this article that my work only makes it worse. This has been in me all along.

    Reply
  29. LJ

    I have, what I feel is, severe misophonia(ticking clocks and everything that rattles or is squeaky). I also have severe tinnitus. Is it common to have both? Also have OCD. Is there something specific that causes all 3 or am I just nuts???

    Reply
  30. sara walls

    I was so happy when I found out that this is a real ‘thing’. I can’t stand snoring. When my boyfriend snores, I can’t decide whether I want to kill him or myself. I have had to leave the house before so that I didn’t hit him in his sleep. The sound just makes me so incredibly angry. It’s a good thing that when he’s asleep he can’t hear the horrible things I say to him when he snores! I have to wear earplugs every night and sometimes during the day, or else I can’t even think. All I can do is fixate on the sound.
    I also hate pulling the cotton out of pill bottles. I can’t even do it myself, I have to have someone else do it for me. It’s so bad that just thinking and writing about it made my mouth start watering, and not in a good way.

    Reply
  31. Tahlia

    i already suffer from severe depression and anxiety which is always made worse by my misophonia. I’m 15 and have younger brothers who are 7 and 11 and extremely energetic and just don’t stop running around or doing something which is incredibly hard to deal with. When they use there imagination and play with there toys it’s great as that’s what kids should be doing but they always make blowing and shhh or skkk sounds or a bunch of sound affect type noises and it’s one of my worst triggers and i feel terrible to tell them off but i can’t handle it, neither or them know how to eat with there mouths closed so chewing is also a big issue and honestly 90% of the sounds they make everyday is so irritating and overwhelming that i have to tell them off or ask them to stop often resulting in me getting told off by mum or my brothers so most of the time i just end up shutting myself in my room and not often coming out unless i really have to mix that with all my support: physiologist and councilors telling me to spend more time with or around my family becomes extremely upsetting and cause me a lot of distress, I’ll definitely be mentioning it to them next appointment and hopefully getting some help.

    Reply
  32. Phillip Hines

    Until now I thought it was just me being too sensitive, I didn’t even know this existed until I saw a Facebook meme on it. Anyone know how to deal with it. Sick and tired of these triggers affecting me so much, some times you just feel like hitting the person to make them stop the heavy breathing or the loud chewing

    Reply
  33. Liz

    Wow this makes me feel like so much less of a bad person! My six year-old step-daughter annoys me more than anyone else with how loud she chews, scuffing her feet when walking, any repetitive noises really, and when I get mad at her I just feel SO bad after and my husband gets mad at me too! I can’t seem to control it, and it’s like that sound becomes ALL I can focus on until I end up exploding! It’s been like this since I was a kid, but back then it was my siblings I couldn’t stand being around. Oh God, the sound of people cutting their nails, they used to torture me with that. I talked to a psychiatrist about how so many sounds annoy me SO much it is ridiculous, but he didn’t really say much. I always thought it was related to ADHD, but now I’m wondering about OCD too…

    Reply
  34. Faith

    Makes me feel better to know it’s not just me. Mine is certainly compounded by my adult ADHD. When I am on the phone or doing something that requires my full attention, any one so much as talking in the same room drives me insane. I sent this article to my mom to help her understand why when we are on the phone, especially when I am on my bluetooth, all those crazy things she is doing in the background that seem innocent to her (shuffling papers, talking to her cats, running water, typing on her keyboard, etc.) illicit a response from me that to her seems out of proportion for the activity. Now I know why and hopefully, her reading this, will make her more understanding. I am not trying to be a raging b*, it just happens when she makes those noises.

    Reply
  35. Rosemariemoran@eircom.net

    I literally can not stand my sister at mealtime..while she eats in my company I have to find some inner hiding place to drown out the noise.i do get agitated but I try not to let it show.i hide the Bombay mix when she comes to visit!!

    Reply
  36. Margaret R

    I have misophonia too like many with this wonderful affliction I find most day to day noises extremely irritating.
    I have passed this on to my daughters who find most noises dreadful most of the time.
    So pleased to know we aren’t alone.

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *