Symptoms & Triggers

The definition of misophonia is the hatred of sound. But a person with misophonia does not hate all sound. They’re only sensitive to certain sounds. And those sounds are usually unique to each person. Pretty much any sound can become a problem for a person with misophonia. Often, these sounds are background noise. Another common type of trigger sound are those made by the mouth and nasal noises (chewing, sniffling, etc.)

 

The collection of sounds that affects a person is called that person’s trigger set. It is possible to add to one’s trigger set over time. Additionally, some people are sensitive to the things that they see. Misokinesia is the word that describes having visual triggers.

 

Being exposed to a trigger sound creates an immediate negative emotional response. This response can range from moderate discomfort to panic or rage. Fight or flight reactions are not uncommon. During a trigger event, a person may become agitated, defensive, or even offensive. They may also distance themselves from the trigger, or mimic the sound.

The sound of fingernails scraping down a chalkboard is unpleasant.

But this is a very mild example of what people with misophonia experience. It lacks the intensity associated with misophonia. The fingernail sound doesn’t cause people to have a strong emotional reaction. Not liking something, even if very strongly, doesn’t usually make a person want to lash out. Moreover, it’s not likely to produce a fight or flight reflex.

 

The people closest to the person with misophonia often elicit the most problematic triggers. This fact can make personal relationships difficult.

An environment known to include trigger sounds can limit social activities because the person with misophonia can anticipate probable trigger events. People with misophonia may isolate themselves in an attempt to reduce the stress that sound triggers cause.

Those with misophonia can be reluctant to share their symptoms and triggers.

 
Sharing can have uncertain outcomes.
 
Sometimes, people mock those with sound sensitivities. Some go as far as making exaggerated trigger sounds to tease or taunt. Additionally, some family, friends, and co-workers try to make light of the problem. People with misophonia are sometimes told to “try to ignore the sound.” Or they’re told that they’re “being difficult” or “don’t let it get to you.” Suggestions like these, even if well-intended, are not usually helpful.
 
For people with misophonia, it is not a matter of making a conscious decision to ignore triggers. If people with misophonia could ignore their triggers they wouldn’t have misophonia.
 
On the other hand, there are well-intentioned people who are supportive. Anyone with a problem or difficulty appreciates an occasional helping hand. So, if you know someone with misophonia and want to help them, all you need to do is ask what you can do to help. If you’d like to explain misophonia to someone in a letter, we have one available here.

 

List of Common Triggers

There is a chance that reading about triggers can cause one to take on the described trigger. But, this only happens to some people, some of the time. Also, some people report that hearing or imagining sample trigger sounds can be a problem.

If learning about new trigger sounds could be a problem for you, stop reading this page now.

 

People Sounds

Mouth and Eating: “ahhs” after drinking, burping, chewing, crunching (ice or other hard food), gulping, gum chewing and popping, kissing sounds, nail-biting, silverware scraping teeth or a plate, slurping, sipping, licking, smacking, spitting, sucking (ice, etc.), swallowing, talking with food in mouth, tooth brushing, flossing, tooth sucking, lip-smacking, wet mouth sounds, grinding teeth, throat clearing, jaw clicking.

Breathing/Nasal: grunting, groaning, screaming, loud or soft breathing, sniffling, snorting, snoring, sneezing, loud or soft talking, raspy voices, congested breathing, hiccups, yawning, nose whistling and wheezing.

Vocal: humming, muffled talking, nasally voices, overused words such as um or ah (repeated words), sibilant sounds (S, P, T, CH, K, B sounds), singing, gravelly voices, bad singing, soft whisper-like voices and whistling.

Baby: Baby crying, babbling, adults using baby talk, kids yelling.

Environmental Sounds

Household/Office: clicking from texting, keyboard/mouse, TV remote, pen clicking, writing sounds, papers rustling/ripping, ticking clocks, texting, cell phone ringtone.

Utensils/metals: dishes clattering, fork scraping teeth, silverware hitting plates or other silverware and rattling change in pockets.

Plastic: water bottle squeezing/crinkling, breaking hard plastic, bouncing balls.

Wrappers: plastic bags crinkling/rustling, plastic bags opening or being rubbed, crinkling food packages.

Cars: sitting idling for long periods of time, beep when a car is locked, car doors slamming, keys banging against steering column, turn signal clicking.

Heavy equipment: lawnmowers, leaf blower, air conditioners, chainsaws.

Impact sounds: other people’s voices, muffled bass music or TV through walls, doors/windows being slammed, basketball thumps.

Animal noises: dogs barking, bird sounds, crickets, frogs, dogs or cats licking, drinking, slurping, eating, whining, dogs scratching themselves and trying to bite their fleas, claws tapping.

TV: loud TV or radio, static.

Body Movement-related: foot shuffling (dry feet on floor/carpet) or tapping, finger snapping, foot-dragging, heels, flip-flops, knuckle/joint cracking, eye blinking, nail-biting and clipping, eating, chewing, fidgeting, hair twirling, movements out of the corner of eyes, repetitive foot or body movements, jaw chewing/movement.

My Misophonia by Mark Loughman (feat) Rodger Carter




129 Comments

  1. I don’t know if it’s just me or if everyone else encountering issues with your
    website. It appears like some of the text on your posts are
    running off the screen. Can somebody else please provide
    feedback and let me know if this is happening to
    them as well? This might be a problem with my browser because I’ve had this happen previously.
    Kudos

    Reply
    • I haven’t noticed this. But it’ll be good to hear from other people.

      Reply
  2. I’ve been taking Lamictal for a year now for this exact issue. My doctor was confused when I explained my symptoms and had no idea how to help me. Somehow he suggested I try this medication. Lamictal has no side effects either! It has been a life saver! I’m able to actually function daily between work and family/kids. I just thought I’d share this!

    Reply
    • Lamictal sadly has life threatening side effects. Please do your homework! But I am glad it has worked for you!!!

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      • Oh my god, it seems like you describe me. I am so happy that I found out it is not just me whos teef hurt while hearing the sound of metal (folk, spoon, etc.). Everyone I tell about what I fell, they start to make fun of me, tell me it is not possible to fell the sound that badly. I try to work on that problem everyday, but my teef just won’t stop hurting. What should I do?

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        • Fro me it’s whispering especially on tv. There is a Michelob ad that has the actress whispering. I have to leave the room to keep from screaming

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          • I Literally Can’t Handle The Sounds You Mentioned Before, I Don’t know why. I Start Having Goosebumps After Hearing The Scratching Sounds , What Can I Do To Ignore It. Idk

        • every time i hear the sound of metal scraping against metal my teeth just feel like i bit into a block of steel but turned into slime, so it feels like that on every square millimeter on my teeth

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      • As someone who has taken Lamictal, I am aware of these life threatening effects. But, if you do your research, you will find that these symptoms are basically 1-in-a-million. That’s the equivalent of saying I don’t want to eat food because I could choke.

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        • I experienced a raft of horrible side effects with lamictal and had to stop taking it. Be careful how you advise people because everyone is different – the side effects are definitely not “one in a million.”

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        • I had just taken Lamictal for a few months when I developed. Rash on my body and inside my mouth. It was Stevens Johnson syndrome. I had to be hospitalized for 3 Days. This is pretty common with Lanictal.

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        • Other than the vehicle nosies I hate all the noises on the list. I have 5 kids and work in an office surrounded by people who eat all day! I wear earplugs basically all the time. It must feel nice not to be on edge or angry all the time! My only peace is skiing or surfing

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        • Side effects in medications are identified during clinical trials and are reported in percentages of group size. While some SEs are low, they are listed because they were identified. Not every patient experiences the same or all of the SEs. Even 1:1,000,000 SE was experienced by a subject or patient. Please do your research but also talk with your physicians about your individual case. Patient A may have experienced a particular side effect because of a concurrent issue or another medication interaction the Patient B isn’t.

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    • I am on Lamictal for epilepsy and it does not help me with this issue which has gotten worse after I had brain surgery to stop my seizures.

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      • Well actually Im also on lamictal, not for epilepsy but for my muscle disorder, myotonia conjenita, if you dont know what that is then search it up, but its helped me with it very well and I’ve been using it for a couple years. I’m also concerned because I think I have severe misophonia 🤔

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    • Since i gave birth 3 years ago, the sound of a baby crying drives me to tears. A few months ago, my husband a shovel over concrete and i almost went nuts from the sound, i feel it in my teeth, my head. I have been wondering if i am going crazy. Thanks for this explanation.

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  3. I just found this website and started crying when I read this. I’ve have a severe case of Misophonia, but I’ve never seen it being broken down so accurately and scientifically. I wish more people were aware of this disorder

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    • Same. I am in research mode. Someone finally gets it. I read the NPR.org article facebook this morning and am elated, weeping, etc…that there might be support for my issue.

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      • I share a lot of symptoms with this, and have two or three of the ‘triggers’ myself, but i haven’t gotten anything related to it medically checked. i don’t want to do a self-diagnosis on myself for obvious reasons but it’s just too uncanny? would it be worth getting it checked out? i’m only young (im under 18) so i don’t know if i should yet. My parents might say im overreacting or something so i’m worried about asking them about it.

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      • I too suffer from misophonia. sounds like wind chimes, leaf blowers, lawn mowers, weed whackers… make me enfuriated. I ruins my day as it leaves me completely irritated and often with a head ache.

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    • I have had severe misophonia since childhood , and pretty much all of these are triggers for me. I completely understand how you feel mate! Stay strong! Usually what helps me is using headphones, or leaving the area. I hope this helps.

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      • Hi Andrew, I am now 52 years old and have suffered acutely from the condition since early childhood. My condition is not just sounds, it is movement as well. Somebody tapping their foot, fingers etc are triggers for me.

        However, if I can offer some encouragement. Despite suffering for the last 50 years, I have managed to have a very successful life in work, relationships etc. I tend to try and avoid situations that will trigger the condition – for example in a restaurant I will position myself so that somebodies feet are not in my line of sight. Or on a plane I will wear earplugs. It helps greatly to have a supportive partner. It also does not seem to be passed down to your children – both of mine do not suffer from any form of misophonia.

        Anyway, the condition is very real and I hope over time it is better recognised and more effective treatments are discovered.

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    • I discovered about misophonia was a real problem after already suffering from it for 10 years. Knowing that I’m not alone gave me some relief but still haven’t been able to convince my family that its a real problem and I am really suffering.

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    • Does anyone notice that you startle easily?

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  4. Lol…. ppl think I’m being weird when I say I get so nauseous when ppl make that snorting sound when they clear their throat. If I’m out eating it’s hideous. I want to throw up.
    I want to throw up thinking about it. Seriously nauseous now.

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    • I feel your pain

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    • I feel your pain….it really is a distraction trying to do things when you have all these sounds around you

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  5. Oh my gosh. It’s like you are describing me! So happy to put a name to it and to know I’m not a freak.

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  6. Nice to see that I am not the only person who has this weird reaction to certain noises. I think my sensitivity is pretty severe. Sometimes, if it’s really quiet at night, the sound of my own pulse will drive me nuts and keep me from sleeping. I couldn’t even watch the entire video. The clapping in the beginning was harsh and the rest of the video is full of ssssss sounds and clicks that grate my nerves. Does anyone else here have severe sensitivity like this?

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    • Ok, so this is going to sound odd. But I was a teenager and I was laying on the couch on my side, so one ear on my pillow. And it was very quiet. I thought I was hearing a mouse chewing like in my couch. I kept sitting up, moving my pillow, pushed on the couch. Didn’t hear it when I sat up. I figured out after about 15 minutes, that it was my pulse I was hearing, like throbbing in my ear. Ever since, I can’t not hear it. Drives me crazy. So many things about this article and everyone commenting on it, finally makes me realize that I’m not alone. Its so hard to explain to my family. Anyone else have migraines, vertigo or motion sickness? Wondering if either has a factor in this..

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      • Wow, I am the same. I get migraines and vertigo. Still seeing an ENT to figure it out. Just had an MRI as looking for tumour. Ruling it out. Anyways, I get the throbbing in the ears a lot as well as the “plugged” feeling. Been like this for nearly 40 years. The sensitivities are wicked and i get angry. Not sure why but I do. Some hurt. I avoid stores now as having visual issues with it as well now then the vertigo starts. Balance is now terrible. Interesting reading here. Hopefully I can get some answers too. 🙂

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  7. I have had problems with sound for as long as I remember the anger and rage felt when I can’t escape the noise can be overwhelming. it is worse when stressed if my neighbour makes a noise I freeze and will be unable to move for as long as the sound lasts. Have just been told I have hyperacusis. however, reading the symptoms and behaviour of someone with extreme misophonia fits with what is happening to me.

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    • I know how you feel I’ve had since I was a kid now 33 and my family used to make noises when they eat on purpose . It’s never gone away I feel such anger when I hear people eat and make noises when drink .

      My mother in law eats like complete crap and I’m about to move to Hong Kong and they are so bad I had to buy noise cancelling earphones and even that don’t always help

      I wish I could stop the feeling

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    • Hi

      I am exactly the same.
      I’ll be woken unwillingly every morning before my slarm on week days and at 7am on weekends by several noises from my neighbor and outside. Trains, cars, people talking, dogs barking, motorcycles, and it will instantly give me severe anxiety before I get out of bed.
      I can’t get any peace at all – except from 3am – 5am and I live in a countryside village!
      It’s really affecting me.

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  8. Oh my, good thing I can say I am just a mild misophoniac. The clicking of the ballpen, the sound of silverware on plate, the chewing sound, any tapping sound, etc. Just recently I cant stand my friend who constantly shook his legs (in sitting position) as if of boredom. Its like he is not focused at all. I can feel his anxiousness for me to finish my talking and then go. Ive already stopped the shaking once before with my own hands and frankly told him that it annoyed me. Although I admit its not about me because it has been his mannerism in ages but still I think I cant get used to it ever. Never did I imagine that this is also categorized as a misophonia. Tnx!

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  9. I get triggered when I hear raised voices through the wall. My parents fought constantly when I was a kid, and anything that sounds like fighting through a wall makes me anxious and I can’t focus. I am better if people are arguing right next to me, but the muffled through the wall sound is too close to what I heard almost every night as a kid.

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  10. I am commenting again… I just read the list and I fit sooooo many more of the sounds then I realized off hand. This explains so much!

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  11. I work in an office/warehouse with Chinese women who can’t walk in their heavy heels or drag their feet, and bring kids to work like it’s daycare. Then I go to my home with Godzilla living upstairs.

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  12. This is relatable for me, lucky I’m only affected by whispering (like someone whispering in my ear) which isn’t often an issue, although on the occasions it does happen I am filled with an unreasonable amount of rage to to point where my brain is screaming for me to lash out physically and I’ll be on edge and angry for hours after.
    Honestly I’d rather be punched in the face than have someone whisper right in my ear.

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  13. I suffer with this really bad, with almost all of the listed triggers affecting me. I try so hard not to get angry about it but it upsets me so much. Lashing out is so hard and I have to leave rooms if loud eating and similar noises are around.

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  14. Omg I really relate to this! But whenever I complain about it to my family they just tell me to stop acting up and sometimes my sister accuses me of listening for annoying sounds , but if I could just ignore them then I would!

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  15. I hate loud crunching noises, someone eating raw carrots or celery. I hate someone clunking their fork on their teeth. I think the worst is someone munching on potato chips. I suffer in silence for the most part. One time my friend had a hard candy in her mouth and was extremely noisy and I asked her nicely to stop the slurping. I try to plug the ear closest to the noise sometimes or hide an ear plug under my hair. I need a meditation tape to help me with this problem.

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    • I had no idea until today that this is a real “thing.” Last week I went out and bought plastic bowls because I cannot handle the sound of my husband scraping ice cream out of a ceramic bowl- and his whistling drives me out of my mind!!! I literally feel so disturbed by it I have to leave the room.

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      • You’re not alone Cathy, just the other day I thought about buying plastic utensils for my household, as the sound of my husband scraping his spoon or fork against our ceramic dishes drives me insane!!

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  16. Yes!!! Finally someone gets it!! Years of wanting to rip off faces because someone is unwrapping candy behind me at church. And the people on TV who talk with heavy vocal fry, baby voice, exaggerated “s” sounds,nasally voice, twangy voice,or dry mouth sounds. My poor hubby gets picked at for throat clearing, loud chomping sounds, and dry mouth sounds. Now I know I am not nuts!! My daughter has this too. Thank you!!

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  17. I was so happy when I found this website. I have had sensivity to the sound of people chewing, snapping gum, jaw popping and others. I have had this since I was a young kid. My family couldn’t understand. J feel so much better knowing it’s not just me. Thank you!! Now if only there was a good treatment!

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    • Snapping gum makes me want to snap their face…..omg….so aggravating!

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  18. Noise coming into my space from outside what I have to call home, is very dangerous for me. Bass, music, television, whistling and even people talking loudly by holding a conversation can be highly stressful.
    I have tried to take my life when I couldn’t get away and most of the time I have to result to self harming.
    Nobody believes me and I feel alone and I could not care anymore and well the train seems like a great idea.
    I’ve suffered for around 11 and a half years with no help and people just taunt me.
    My full story is on going and I cannot share, but my days are now numbered.
    My PTSD plays off this misophonia and vise-versa, I am too far gone for talk, as only management seems to work for me now – Peace and quiet, tranquility.
    Good luck everyone, but I’m done with it and what will be will be.

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    • Stuart, I hope you are still with us. I understand. I have had the same feelings, even have considered a train same as you. Not sure where you live, but see if you can get help somehow even if it seems like there is no hope.

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    • Stuart, sorry to hear of your pain.
      Has Autism/Asperger’s ever been mentioned to you, it could be a possible reason.

      I was recently diagnosed with Asperger’s, I have for long had trouble with processing and sensory overload.
      Autism and trouble processing sounds/smells etc are linked.

      May I suggest you talk to your Doctor about this, it could be the reason behind your pain

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    • Hi, yes noise coming into my personal space I can’t stand,you’re not the only one. Bass music sounds, neighbours DIY noise, I’ve been driven to rage before because of it and felt suicidal,you’re not the only one, ever since we moved house from my childhood home to a house with paper thin walls it started. Moved again to get away from the noise and the problems and they’re here too although not as frequent they’re still here. I know exactly how you feel. People don’t understand and it is horrible.
      Hugs x

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    • Hello, Stuart,

      As I am lying in bed, enduring the noise from a neighbor’s television at 2:36 am, I am hoping and praying that you haven’t hurt yourself or done something bad to yourself.
      I don’t know who you are, but I completely understand where you are coming from; I have the same kinds of triggers that you have!
      I dislike television, bass sounds, vibrating sounds, and basically any muffled sound that can be heard from neighbors.
      To me my room is private—as it is the space I pay for after all—so no neighbor’s dumb music or TV should be penetrating my walls and disturbing my peace.
      Unfortunately, there is very little to nothing I can do about this without appearing ‘crazy’ or ‘neurotic’.

      But the reality is this: we are NOT crazy, the people who make noise are just nuisances! They are selfish, culturally challenged noise polluters who deserve to have their stupid TVs destroyed with baseball bats. Same with people who play obnoxiously loud music.
      Why is it that animals and birds run away when they hear music in the woods? Because it is ugly and unnatural!
      So no, please don’t hurt yourself over stupid, disgusting people!

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  19. Chewing noises have annoyed me since being a teenager, I think. I’m 41 now.
    My family have always known but I think they saw it as me being over the top or rude.
    I think I have improved over the years, or learnt how to deal with it better, I.e I like eating out or with music on as it drowns it out. However, I think other triggers may have taken over now – sniffing or snorting, scraping of cutlery on plates when people are eating, eating with your mouth open or with food in your mouth.
    I think I’ve always struggled with wondering if I do have an issue, or if it’s just bad manners to eat with your mouth full, continually sniff without using a tissue, slurp etc – if you say something to them it is thought that you are rude for saying so… x

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  20. I have really bad misophonia. Ever since I was little certain sounds bugged me and I never knew why. When I was about 9, I was diagnosed with it. Little thinks that people do every day bug me so bad, so much that I try to avoid going to social events. Chewing bugs me. Humming and singing bugs me. The sound of paper bugs me. The worst part of it though, is that my sisters say that I take away their childhood from them because singing bugs me. I feel so guilty about it that it has led me to depression and really bad anxiety. I tried going to a counselor and I tried coping skills but that didn’t work.

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  21. wow- until now, I’d never heard of this, so not sure if I have it. I used o be an extra-vert, now i’m the opposite, I don’t like people anymore, don’t trust easy, and there’s all kinds of what is listed that are very familiar to me.

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  22. As with everyone else, I’ve also suffered for many years of being agitated by certain noises.. (lips smacking, that swallowing ‘smack’ sound when someone is speaking, clanking of silverware against bowls & plates.. and so on).

    But in my case – my Misophonia is getting worse. Now I’m becoming annoyed by reading certain words or names being over used repeatedly.
    It has gotten to the point I don’t like visually seeing people’s names on a website, let alone hear it on TV or Radio.

    A lot of good points or arguments on any given topic is lost when listening to radio or TV… and the person speaking makes mouth noises. I have to quickly turn them off or change the channel. (no matter who is speaking).

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  23. Wow! I’m a health psych professional and I never heard of this! I thought it was just me. I guess mine is very mild, b/c I didn’t see some of my triggers on the lists. My worst are little kids screeching in the grocery store and people with lispy speech being commentators on public media. Sniffing sends me up the wall- I have even given tissues to people in the movie theater. Never thought this was a problem until I read about it in the “Dear Abby” column in the Sunday paper! Go figure!

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  24. I too have suffered from misophonia but until recent never knew it had a name. Crunching hard candy and ice irritate me. Loud chewing, etc. I have sufferred through alot of times too embarassed to say anything. I am 67 yr old. I never wanted to appear as a “freak”!
    As of late outside noises like the clanging of a flagpole or wind chimes can paralyze me I cannot “block” them out as some have suggested. I love to be outside so this is a problem. I don’t want to be the “bitch” of the neighborhood but I have found some flagpole silencers for my neighbot and they have cooperated so far. Recently a new person moved into our area and he has a very loud pickup and it rattles me to the bone. This too has upset me tremendously.
    Hoping to find some help for this.

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  25. I also suffer from misophonia and I was very happy when I read it was a condition and there are others like me out there. My family thought I disliked them growing up as I would not want to eat together with them, especially my parents and grandparents made very annoying noises that made me feel angry and anxious. Now I live alone, but that’s not a solution I suppose. I also avoid public transportation, but I try to sometimes to cope with it with very loud music. If my phone dies, I panic.
    I have talked about it with a psychologist in a few sessions and he suggested I confront the sounds instead of deafening it or removing myself from the situation. I stopped seeing him, I could do a few minutes and his suggestion didn’t help.
    I also noticed that seeing someone chewing gum (even if I dont hear them, I imagine the sound) produces the same overwhelming feelings. If the person is in my sight, I am moving away. It takes me few minutes to calm down.
    Recently I’m having a hard time at work when people around me talk and laugh around me. I also noticed that if Im tired or stressed, im more prone to see/ hear triggers everywhere. So a good state of mind and rest is important for me to cope with it and control lashing out or how overwhelming the feelings get. Im sometimes telling them nicely that its distracting and I cannot concentrate (if I know them well enough), but I feel Im alienating my colleagues and its just hard living like this. I really need help :(, I wish there would be more information available on possible treatments or some coping mechanisms.
    If anyone has some that worked for them, pls let me know.

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  26. The last few years I have been experiencing a problem where I panic about noise in my apartment which seems to be coming from neighbours above which can be from scraping a chair on the floor to them walking around which then I hear a bass noise which then starts me off whit my heart racing and then start getting axmcity and I start panicking and start getting annoyed and don’t want to be here. I have to walk around sometimes with headphones or just go out to get away from any tap or any noise. I have spoken to family and they have said there is a condition and see what help is needed as this is affecting my job and my relationship and will cause further problems. Is this something a GP could help with ?

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  27. My husband started making raspberry sounds and “gold fish face” within the last week years. The fish face also comes with a pa pa pa sound. It seems like he can’t breath out of his nose. I lose it on him constantly because it goes in for so long. Our relationship is suffering over it. Since he would find a cure for his problem, I am really hoping to find a cure for mine.

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  28. its distance traffic and light winds any kinda soft sounds that get to me unbearable at bed time

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  29. Wow! This is a real thing. I always thought it was just me. I am extremely annoyed by the sound of someone eating, except when I am also eating. My solution has always been to leave the room or get my own snack. My husband has thought I was nuts.

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  30. Thank you NPR for having a story about this and prompting me to do more research. I always knew someting was not normal about me, but now I know I’m not alone. It’s so amazing when you find out there are other people with your problem. I didn’t watch the video, because just reading about the triggers made me have to plug my ears really hard.

    I first noticed it when I was a kid and my dad’s eating drove me crazy. That was over 40 years ago.

    ……..

    One symptom not mentioned, that I’m wondering if it is related, is in order to sleep at night without being woken up by every little noise, I have to use a sound spa that plays a waterfall. Even though it annoys me, it’s better than the alternative…BUT once I turn it off there is a noise inside my head & ears. This also happens after concerts or a loud TV, etc. It lasts for about an hour. It sounds like static in my head and feels like it’s slightly vibrating. Does this happen to anybody else?
    ……..

    By the way, I can’t sleep in the same bed as my husband because every time he breathes or moves it wakes me up. He’s so accomodating. He eats with a plastic spork and warns me if he’s going to make a noise. Most of my coworkers are thoughtfull too. I’m sorry for those people who don’t have understanding people in their lives.

    Oh, and lastly, for the other women out there, my sensitivity is even worse during the week or so I have PMS.

    Good luck to you all.

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  31. Glad to have found this site. For many many years I suffered, I would hear people eating crisps (potato chips), apples, celery etc and I literally have to stop myself from walking over and punching them or strangling them. My rage knows no bounds and it scares me. I thought it was only me. My family thought that my reactions to noisy eating including slurping and chewing was over the top and told me to get a grip of myself, but then one day I saw an article in a newspaper describing exactly this. Sites like this one are a great help, we are not alone, there are lots of us suffering in silence (or not as the case may be). I have tried so many things to stop myself getting worked up but my only real solutions are to put headphones on and listen to loud music, or to walk out of the room. The worse is when I am on a train, no room to move, and someone near me eats, or sniffs. Why do people sniff, it is a vile habit anyway even without misophonia. Fortunately I am strong enough to ask them to stop, but if I did not address it verbally I really do not know where my boundary would lie and whether I would physically assault them. And do not get me started on people taking lunch at their desks at work, please, go to the rest area. Respect my space. A desk is a place of work, take your noisy food away from me .

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  32. Do I have this disorder or things I really hear or see or even think are true…..🤔

    Reply
  33. When I saw a WebMD article I couldn’t believe that there is a name for this. I have tried to search it up with words like sound or noise sensitivity. This started with neighbors, sometimes in front or behind my house, and people would play their music outside and all I can hear inside my house is the bass coming through my windows and walls. It drives me to insanity. It isn’t that loud but I can “feel” it. Then other things like chatty office and coworkers playing finger drums on their desk or humming. When I tried to politely and jokingly ask some guys not to drum they thought I was nuts and laughed at me. People say to ignore it but I can’t. I happy that there is a name for this to associate with.

    Reply
  34. I heard about Misophonia about 2 or 3 years ago and just read the NPR article. I told my sister about it, and I think it made us both feel a bit better that we weren’t just angered easily, that there’s a reason behind some of it. She and I both have had problems with noises since we were little kids. Eating, chewing noises and what seem like exaggerated mouth movements send us both to the moon. Gum chewing, snapping and popping, mouth movements, kissing/smacking noises, low music/bass sounds really are triggers for me. For her, it’s the same with mouth noises, but also jangling coins in pockets, or keys, seeing someone pick at dry cuticles, are some of what sets her off. We both have experienced the anger, shooting annoying, mean looks to the offender – as if that helps or that person even knows what they’re doing wrong. But sometimes it is just people not having manners, like talking with their mouth full. I can’t watch TV with someone who is wriggling their toes or swinging a crossed leg. I have to block that view, usually with a pillow and my body contorted in some way, anxious that I might still get a glimpse of it. Now that there’s a name to my reactions, my husband has been much more understanding. I never could tolerate him kissing or nuzzling me on my ears. I’m extremely sensitive to loud noises, like on the TV when the show goes to commercials or someone who I think is talking too loud. I can’t go to movie theaters and I become anxious if I see someone chewing gum near me where I can’t move (seat on plane, concert seat, work meeting). I wonder sometimes if it’s an auditory issue – a physical problem with my hearing. I really appreciate everyone’s comments and sharing on here – they’ve described some things so perfectly that I experience.

    Reply
    • Lisa, when you said you block the view of someone wiggling their leg with a pillow or by contorting your body, etc…that’s totally ME.
      I can relate to many other’s issues on this board, but yours was the first I saw on this.
      I used to do the exact same thing with my husband, who swished his legs and knees (crazy fast) most of the time. In the car, watching tv, everywhere.

      He has three sons and one of them did the same. If he was sitting close I’d grab his son’s leg and say “Mr. Fidget, this MUST stop!” He would laugh and try to stop, but was soon doing it again. I think it was anxiety related (for both), they both also have ADD.

      My husband (a psychologist) has other issues of his own. For example, I couldn’t say “gravy” or “marshmallows” around him. Running the vacuum made him queasy.
      He was incredibly tolerant of my noise issues (he would leave the room when he ate his handful of almonds every night). When he stopped doing that I should’ve taken it as a sign.

      We’re in the process of divorcing now, mostly the result of other issues, but the thought of finding someone else that tolerant seems like a long shot to me. Best wishes to you.

      PS – has anyone else noticed the recent commercials with ice chomping and chip crunching? Colgate and Duracell are two of them, I can’t think of the 3rd one right now. It makes me wanna stab my eardrums out with an ice pick. Who in Gods name would think that’s a GOOD idea? And don’t get me started on the one where a deer crashes into a windshield (Midas) making a horrible chalkboardy screech. It’s kind of old, but I saw it again recently.

      Reply
    • Oh, and Lisa, I haven’t been to the theatre since Titanic. 🥴

      Reply
    • I’m exactly like you pertaining to gum chewing and gum cracking and I’ve been this way since I can remember. The sound of bass music playing in a car next to me is a trigger and I’m a musician. Years ago while living in apartments was misery. At one place two deaf men lived next to my den and despite being deaf, their TV was always at max volume.

      I used to fly a lot and being seated next to a gum cracker would be extremely uncomfortable. I’ve been able to cope better as I’ve aged but there are still things that trigger me.

      I knew when I heard Brian Killmeade of Fox News say he had issues with gum chewing that I wasn’t alone or crazy.

      Reply
  35. I am so glad I found this informative website. I too thought it was just me. I bring my IPOD to work when I have to deal with coworkers eating loudly. I feel for my spouse though, I can’t stand eating dinner with him because the sound of his chewing and crunching makes me want to throat punch him repeatedly. I feel like I have no control over my rage. I also am driven to full rage by people dragging their shoes or the flip flopping of their shoes. Even typing about it makes me angry. Ugh.

    Reply
  36. I think i might have some form of this. I feel panic from repetitive noises sometimes, like clocks, or especially things like wind chimes. If an air conditioner or furnace has a repetitive thumping i go crazy and have to flee! It seems to be getting worse as i get older.

    Reply
  37. For “body movement related” some of this is not just sounds, but physical sensation. For me, it’s dry feet touching overly-dry rugs (as mentioned) but dry/dusty sand/dirt is also a trigger. When I go to beach, I need a bottle of water to pour on feet before I put shoes back on, non-negotiable. All other trigger sounds are accurately described.

    Age is another piece that should be called out here: most folks start experiencing symptoms very early (I can remember telling friends not to smack their food when I was five).

    Reply
    • Emily, omg, the dryness with feet AND hands, I totally get it. I can only wear cotton, other fabrics just feel creepy on my hands and feet.
      I don’t play basketball but the thought of how gritty they feel gives me a bad shiver.. I buy cheap toilet tissue – bc it doesn’t give off “dust” in the air (like Charmin does.)
      The word “chalkboard “ alone will make my arm hair stand up an inch.
      It’s insane.
      I heard about misophonia a few years ago, it’s nice to hear other stories, I can totally relate.

      Reply
  38. Our 13 year old son has found it very difficult to eat with us at the family table without music playing in the background. He gets very agitated and tries to leave the room unless we allow music. This started years ago. Now that I understand, I will make sure there is always background noise before he even comes to the table. The last thing we want to do is alienate him or make him feel different. Now he can know that he’s not alone and there’s nothing ‘wrong’ with him.

    This is a very helpful website and the comments are worth reading. I hope recognition and awareness of misophonia increases.

    Reply
  39. I cant handle the sound of people walking on snow. It feels like my teeth are going to drop from my mouth and I get the urge to bite my lips, sometimes too hard when I hear it. I also have trouble breathing normally if I hear it for too long and I start talking loudly to not hear the sound. im not crazy I swear but I dont know how to make that feeling go away.

    https://youtu.be/l35cs9_Pb-M?t=64

    This video is an example of the sound, as soon as I heard the sound I was like what is wrong with me?. I muted the video and got into this website.

    Reply
  40. Thank God others know what I am going through. I won’t go into all my triggers, but I will say it bothers me most when people know some of my triggers and they do it anyway. My family does this to me at times and it is frustrating that they expect me to leave a room and go someplace else even though I was there first. I just found a local support group that I am going to try. Peace be with all of you!

    Reply
  41. I’ve known for years that I have misophonia. For much of that time, I thought it was uncommon. Reading others’ comments made me feel part of an extensive but little-understood community. I’ve had to define misophonia for various therapists, and am grateful it’s receiving attention in media. This article’s ‘fingernails on a chalkboard’ is the ideal example of the public’s misconception. Yes, we all have noises that irritate us or hurt if they are ear-piercing, but the rage and fight-or-flight response to the persistent rattling of a chip bag is something else entirely. Something odd in my case: I have maybe a dozen triggers, but there are others that only bother me when I hear them recorded or broadcast. Applause in person doesn’t bother me at all, and I will clap too, but I can’t stand hearing it on television. The same applies to keyboard clicking, horses clippety-clopping (I wear earplugs when my husband watches Westerns) and liquids poured (as in soda commercials). I stock groceries at night and luckily have no triggers (on day shift, the clicking of high heels or people scuffling their feet often made me flee to another aisle, and if this happens when I’m the one shopping, I’ve been known to say, ‘I didn’t know they allowed ponies in the store’). I do not like being a jerk, I usually refrain from even giving a dirty look, but, oh, the blood pressure spike! I wish this was one of those disorders that tends to mellow out with age. From what I’ve read, it doesn’t.

    Reply
    • I can relate to your case-by-case trigger. I rarely have a problem watching people eat on YouTube, but cannot stand certain eating sounds in person.

      Reply
  42. This is literally the best, most accurate website for this! I wish more people could learn about misophonia and how it can really impact a sufferer’s life 😮
    I’ve had it for a while but only just recently found out what it is. It’s gotten to that point where I can’t stand singing, talking, mumbling, dog noises, babies, tapping, pretty much everything. I tend to react violently and the only way for me to get away from the noise is to listen to loud music, or to yell at the person to stop. Oftentimes I get an anxiety attack to go with it.

    I’ve tried telling my family about it, but my mom and sister think it’s baloney. My dad understood me but I think he forgot. My sister even goes out of her way to make noises that bother me, and throws a fit if I ask her to stop (which causes everyone else to get angry). It seems like it’s making me and everyone around me miserable.

    Reply
  43. I thought I’d ask what you guys think because I feel like I might be being overdramatic. Essentially, yeah, a lot of these noises do irritate me, like chewing or nose whistling. On the other hand, if someone was to, say, rub their hands against their jeans, I don’t know what it is about that sound, but when I hear it, especially if I’m not expecting it, it’s like my brain temporarily freezes and my body inadvertently curls in on itself to get away from the noise, and I sort of inadvertently angle myself away from the person who’s making the noise. After the brief freeze, the sheer rage that comes over me is really intense, but I can’t move, and after it passes, it feels quite shocking to think that I felt that way, because that’s not like me at all.

    Do you guys think this sounds about right? It’s been really affecting me in my classes at university, but I’m not sure what can be done about it. I thought that it was just a stupid irrational hatred at first, and I was maybe overreacting, but after seeing this list of trigger sounds, it’s all starting to feel like it might be something legitimate. I’m seeing a counsellor for an unrelated problem. Do you think they’d be the right person to offer advice if I brought it up, or is this something to talk to a doctor about?

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  44. this the most up-to-date site I’ve seen about this so I guess I can chime in…always had terrible anxiety when Mom and anybody else is chewing gum, sends my anxiety sky high especially when they pop it….hate other chewing sounds…… I like soft-spoken, intentional explanatory ASMR, but HATE people whispering and high-pitched soft-spoken people. I recently had a panic attack from 2 people in my house talking softly and sweetly to each other. I got flashes of anger then covered my ears and then got an overwhelming sobbing headache. Mostly the embarrassment (to myself, they didn’t see anything) and shame from having to escape from meetings or elevators or cashier lines when people are making mouth noises is worse than the disorder itself. They are human beings, everybody makes noises, so why do I get so repulsed and angry? I also have some tactile and noise sensitivity, my Mom was diagnosed with ADHD and my brother is ASD but I haven’t ever gotten any diagnoses for me except GAD (generalized anxiety disorder) about 10 years ago. Looking forward to hearing possible solutions

    Reply
  45. I’m 14 and I have known I had this for a while but I didn’t know that so many other people had it. I always feel so alone when I tell my parents things bother me and they always tell me to suck it up or deal with it and they don’t know how hard that really is. It’s so bad that it gets me to the point of wanting to throw or hurt the person that is making the sound. Or sometimes I just break down and cry. It’s silverware on plates, breathing, chewing, licking, sucking, throat clearing, I just can’t stand it.

    Reply
    • I hope it helps you to know that you are not alone with this issue. I’m 64 but still remember that age (14) and parents not understanding. Some things just are the way they are and it’s not your fault.

      Reply
  46. I have serious misophonia. I have to leave the room if I hear someone crunch potato chips. I’ve noticed I’m getting worse about it. It used to just aggravate me. Now I’m noticing it is an instant rage reaction. I hate that I have this.

    Reply
    • I’m worried that my condition seems to be worsening.

      Reply
  47. i have looked at so many websites about this and i know i have this but its still so shocking to see that other people have it too. my parents always tell me to suck it up or get over it, but they don’t understand how hard that actually is, anyone understand?

    Reply
  48. I have a self-diagnosed misophonia, and it just drives me crazy. To counter it, I have now started putting earplugs just so that I can avoid any unnecessary sound around me.

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  49. I was so happy to find out this term exists. I hate the sound of people chewing with their mouth open, smacking gum, teeth on utensils when ppl eat, and such. It puts a pit in my stomach and I can’t focus on any other sound when I hear it. My family gets mad because I always comment while they eat and get annoyed. It was satisfying to tell my husband my level of annoyance I experience is a real thing.

    Reply
  50. Could you have misophonia if you hate certain sounds from another language? Hindi grinds my gears. It’s not that I hate foreign languages; that’s not it at all!! I can watch anime (Japanese cartoons) all day and not get irritated. I can listen to Latin, Japanese, Russian, etc. opera music and not get the slightest negative reaction. However, when I have to listen to my roommate talk in Hindi, it’s so annoying! I don’t know what it is.

    Somebody, please help me figure this out. It’s so bad that I want to throw a chair at someone. I’m not kidding.

    Reply
  51. this is my story. everywhere, the noises. forks and spoons on plates. my mom two rooms away clearing her throat. i seriously just want to end it sometimes. i feel like a freak. “suck it up, get over it” they tell me. but they don’t realize i can’t. it never stops. i don’t think it ever will. i want to rip my ears off. stop the pain. i break down and cry. i can’t tell my friends. i can’t complain to my parents. who can i turn to. where can i go. constantly angry, sad, annoyed. why can’t this stop…

    Reply
  52. this is my story. everywhere, the noises. forks and spoons on plates. my mom two rooms away clearing her throat. i seriously just want to end it sometimes. i feel like a freak. “suck it up, get over it” they tell me. but they don’t realize i can’t. it never stops. i don’t think it ever will. i want to rip my ears off. stop the pain. i break down and cry. i can’t tell my friends. i can’t complain to my parents. who can i turn to. where can i go. constantly angry, sad, annoyed. why can’t this stop…

    Reply
  53. Wondering if this is just me but I have always hated hearing or seeing people sigh it literally makes me want to rip my hair out I usually hold my breath when people do it. Does that mean I have Misophonia

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  54. I am definitely a misophonia sufferer! I try to alleviate the noise, move away from it or drown it out with other noises….i.e., turn the radio up over whispering – remove the plastic rings from water bottles so they don’t rattle, etc. Mostly I start to have anxiety and just want to grit my teeth and cover my ears……I hope they find a way to reverse it, as I do believe mine is getting worse.

    Reply
  55. OMG!!!
    I’ve known there was something not right for years.
    I can fly into a rage at my youngest son “smacking” his lips when eating, my elest son “slurping” his chicken, my wife crunching an apple, my workmate “snapping” a carrot.
    I hear the door chimes and have to jump up to investigate.
    An unanswered telephone makes me apoplectic.
    A slamming door or gate, makes me furious.
    And as for the noisy bearings in the washing machine at spin cycle, children crying/screaming/fighting. You don’t want to be in the same post code as me…..
    Yet I enjoy heavy metal music but kind of endure Electronic Dance Music; a Spin Doctors albumn really rubs me up the wrong way.
    As an engineer, I work in noisy chemical plants and power stations with very loud machinery. This doesn’t bother me, but I have to wear over-the-ear ear defenders.

    This has been a problem for probably at least 25 years (I’m 51).
    It has been close to destroying my marriage and and damaged the relationship between me and my sons (18 and 21) ‘cos I’m the bad-tempered Dad who comes in from the office (or site) on an evening, then flies off the handle.

    I probably have OCD tendencies with a hint of autism (I suppose that’s why I’m an engineer) which doesn’t help.

    Now I understand, I’ll seek help. If there’s non available in the UK, at least I can manage the condition.
    And I though I was going mad.

    Reply
  56. I had heard about this syndrome (is that the right word?) on NPR a few weeks ago. Glad to see support. I think that I am in a profession (teaching) which makes it worse. I always thought there was something wrong with me. Pencil tapping, eating, candy wrapper opening… all those things are worse than nails on a chalkboard. Also, can’t stand hearing people eat. So far, my only way to calm it down, is to eat with them. People eating behind me is the worst, can’t sit in a movie theater. It’s a fight or flight reaction. I became irrational when triggered. I thought it was part of my OCD or ADHD. Even the clicking of a cellphone drives me up the wall.

    Reply
  57. I seriously hate the sound of sweepers (hand-held vacuums don’t bother me usually) and chainsaws! I rarely, rarely, hear chainsaws (or even sweepers), but even when or if I see someone getting ready to vacuum, I get angry and it worsens when I hear it. I have to flee, when or if I can, and if it’s possible, I get my phone and earbuds and listen to music or two of my seriously (I mean that) favorite sounds. I don’t turn the volume up too loud. I have hated those two sounds for years and I always will.

    Reply
  58. I’m not hating any particular sound. I only hate them when they keep repeating. It could be from electronic device, like fan, refrigerator, or air conditioner, etc.
    They make me feel extremely uncomfortable, frustrated, anxious, as if I’m on survival mode. I wish I were deaf sometimes. I can’t ignore them. I just want to die so I don’t have to suffer this. It’s terrible. Those sound are everywhere. From my own house to my working place. Even on the road. There is no place where I feel safe.

    Are there anything I can do to get rid of this?

    Reply
  59. The sound of lawn mowers, weed eaters, chainsaws, & motorcycles all immediately make me angry.
    I am glad I found this site. Now I have a name for this, and know I’m not going crazy. THANK YOU!!!

    Reply
  60. I’ve just started a new job and the woman who’s training me (who’s very nice) is constantly sucking on crunchy sweets, even when she’s on the phone to a customer. When she’s sat next to me training me I feel like I have to work really hard not to burst into tears. I’ve never been triggered so badly before. I’m worried it’s going to push me into an anxiety attack.

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  61. I’ve had it for as long as I can remember. I used to throw things at my sister when we shared a room when we were younger. She would fall asleep quite quickly which left me listening to her breathing sounds etc. I can remember occasions where I would actually jump on her bed to wake her up when I couldn’t stand it anymore. My mother is one of those people that tell you to “just ignore it” or “don’t let things bother you so much”. She makes constant mouth noises similar to trying to get a piece of food that’s stuck between your teeth out by sucking air through the offending area. She does it even when there’s no food there. It’s something I’ve asked nicely about and also lost it with her at times so she’s well aware how much it irritates me. Still, she makes NO effort to stop or even temper it. The result is that I don’t go to see her anywhere near as much as I should. The fact she doesn’t try irritates me even more!

    Reply
  62. I dont know if its just me or nobody but i lashed out twice from a dog whistle app being used in my class and the first time it happened i yelled for it to stop then had a panic attack attack after it stopped. Im not sure if i have it but i looked up what could be the cause and this came up.

    Reply
  63. I have misophonia, and some of my common triggers are plastic rustling, mouth sounds, and chewing. I listen to ASMR quite often, and some of the ASMR triggers that create the most tingles for me are plastic rusting, mouth sounds, and chewing. Is this normal?

    Reply
    • Hi All,

      I can’t stand sniffing or chewing. My marriage is at risk because my wife can’t stand it anymore. When she gets a cold it drives me literally insane.

      Can anyone help?

      Reply
      • I understand completely. I am in the same boat. Phlegm noises, coughing, sniffing, the raspy hoarse voice… My blood starts to boil (especially when they cough all bloody night long) and I have to politely ask my partner (and my parents when I was a kid) to stop talking until he’s had a honey-ginger tea or senega-and-ammonia syrup, even though my mind is saying “SHUT THE F UF BEFORE I STRANGLE YOU!!!!”

        At this stage, the best I could suggest is talking to a Psychiatrist (not a counselor) – maybe they will have some medication or will be able to recommend a specific type of therapy which will help. I am going to do the same.

        Reply
  64. A lot of things annoy me like the typical chewing and metal but nothing is worse than loud music where it shouldnt be. My roommate lovesss blasting music at night and it gives me so much anxiety I literally have cried over it if its not turned down after a few minutes even if Im not about to sleep. I wish I knew why because concerts never bother me but anything that just seems inappropriate place or time will bring me to full panic.

    Reply
  65. i didnt knew all this ranging anger from some sounds has a name.
    i been saying i have some sort of like sound alergy.

    gives me rage, anger, pull ugly faces , wierd acidity in my lowe teeth and stress.

    is very frusteating wife and kids thinking i hate them or i avoid them . but no. have to hide from kids chewing mouth open cant stand it.

    and driving car with kids playing with plastic bags or crips bags is a no.

    is very stressfull , they think im a wierdow and i will try my best to explain to them my spunds itolerance.

    misophonia is a new word for me .

    i search google as ” can t stand chewing noises ” thank you

    Reply
    • This is a relief. I have looked up misophonia in the past and it was pretty much limited to tapping, chewing, and slurping. Whilst those can be annoying, for me, that is nothing compared to the “clicky” saliva sounds when people enunciate their consonants more than their vowels. This makes things like listening to guided meditation or my university lecture recordings extremely unpleasant. “JuSSTT rela-K-S, TaKe a DeeP Breath and ConCenTraT-uh on your boDy’s SenSSationSS-uh”. When I went to rehab, I lost it and bolted out of group therapy after 20 minutes of it (wanted to strangle the therapist too). It literally sends tingling sensations down my body and causes me to twitch and shudder. Same goes for the raspy voices, phlegm noises (chest colds), coughing in general, randomly singing, other “sick” noises, and sudden loud noises like screaming babies, dishes (including pots and pans) falling – my blood immediately boils when this happens.

      Anyway, thanks for letting me vent. Glad to not be alone here.

      Reply
  66. Oh yes. Im not alone. Acute hearing. I hear things before others. Certain sounds have always caused reactions. Pain. Naseau. Jumping. Startle reflex Head injuries. Accidents. Physical abuse. Noises triggering PTSD n multitude other medical issues.
    Too long for here all interconnected.

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  67. I am 66. I have suffered from misophonia since my teens and it has gotten noticeably worse over the year. My daughter also has it, so I am certain it is a genetic condition. I often travel by plane – so headphones are a godsend. I also noticed that even reading about triggers (as noted above) can set off a mild case for me.

    Reply
  68. Wow – although I don’t think my Misophonia is severe, my boyfriend in particular doesn’t understand when I ask him to turn up the volume on the television when we are eating in front of it because I can’t stand the sound of someone eating. Just chewing alone is awful, but if someone is also smacking their lips or hitting the fork against their teeth I have to leave the room. Once I get annoyed with a triggering noise I can be set off by things that don’t usually bother me as much – the cleaning up of dirty dishes (scraping, clanging, etc.)
    Another trigger noise for me is whistling – I absolutely cannot concentrate if someone is whistling!

    Reply
  69. I’ve had misophonia as long as I can remember, luckily it’s not a lot of sounds, just mainly the utensils, like plates, and forks dragging, scrapping, or dropping, or in the teeth, and especially white sound static would make me very, very, uncomfortable. I didn’t know there was a term for it until now! It’s comforting to know that I’m not alone in this, I’ve had these discomforts since childhood, thinking it was normal I guess, but I guess it isn’t!

    Reply
  70. I didn’t know what i have had a name until I read a post in a facebook group where someone talked about that and named it. I thought i was all alone in the world, I thought i was weird. But knowing there are many of us out there gives a slight relief I would say.

    Reply
  71. I just learned today that my problem has a name! I thought I was just a ratty, misanthropist person… I’m 47 and I’ve been intolerant toward noises all my life. I recall how I as a child couldn’t stand my mum’s sounds at meal times and how guilty I felt, because I really hated her in those moments and felt the urge to hit her to make her stop… I though I was abnormal, violent… and felt awful about myself. Now, my problem is worsening each day. I hate just hearing people talk on the street, all Kind of sounds made by children (high pitched voices) or elderly people (raspy voices). My daily grind is becoming unbearable. I fear i’m becoming a sour person…

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  72. i can’t stand kids screaming, or bass music and loud tv

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  73. Nobody hates the sound of scratching clothes? I dislike so much the sound of scratching a hat, jeans ,paper sometimes, sofa fabric and some other fabric/clothes. It makes a lump in my throat and I cant bear to hear it

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  74. I remember the very first time I became aware of being offended by a sound. It was my mother chewing cereal. I must have had an unpleasant look on my face because she said something about me not liking the sounds she made while eating. I didn’t know what happened, I was 11 years old. Snoring is really the only sound that makes me angry enough to hit the person; although, someone sucking on their teeth gets me pretty riled up. Most mouth sounds just gross me out. I’m 61 years old now and have learned to just leave the room. I’m thankful when there’s enough conversation around the table to drown those sounds out. I remember how relieved I was discovering other people went through this, too; for years I thought I was the only one and really struggled with it sometimes. Thank goodness for the internet, I’ve actually been able to educate some people about it. My misophonia goes right along with depression, stress, and anxiety.

    Reply
  75. I hate TV. The constant blathering makes me crazy. I can watch movies, but not television and absolutely not commercials. I’ve never been able to tolerate a fork on teeth or scraped on a plate. I’ve recently moved to a place where people like to drive by really fast with loud music blasting and apparently no mufflers. I’m planning a squirtgun paint campaign! 🤪

    Reply
  76. This is crazy, I thought I was the only one with this problem. This site describes me, with most these triggers. I’m to the point that aim day dreaming for headphones that block out all noise. Not that all noises drive me crazy, but the only real please si have is when I’m alone and all is silent. It’s like I live the sound if nothing. Silence is so peaceful.

    I am so excited to learn I’m not alone.

    Reply
    • Wow, my strong feelings toward sounds has a name: Misophonia. Reading the information and everyone’s comments brings me some peace. My family knows I am very sensitive to sound and they think I have a problem with patience. I felt so alone and started to think I’m a crazy & un-compassionate person. For me, I get triggered with repetitive throat clearing, sniffling, shaking legs, crying babies, etc. Some sounds I do highly enjoy and find calming, such as rain hitting the windows and paintbrushes tapping on a canvas. Other sounds do fill me with rage and I need to leave the premises. I feel my heartbeat rise as well. Wish I can cure this because it’s no fun.

      Reply
  77. I wear earplugs 90% of the time. Could have easily commited murder tonight with fireworks going off all the time. Everyday noises get me going and the only way to manage the condition is to stay away/avoid people and noises. Needless to say I am mainly confined to my home as I reckon one day I will lose it completely. I have anxiety issues which I have had for years but when it turns into anger then it must be kept under control as much as possible. I take clonazepam to help with a neurological condition called dystonia and they are all linked. Horrible place to be in and no further treatment available. Looks like I need to find a rural home. The common factor to this condition is uncontrollable noise. I can watch TV without any issue but do keep the sound low as sensitive to noise after wearing earplugs for so long. Hope you all find your peace…

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  78. I cannot stand the sound of someone smacking or whispering. I about go insane when my mother is in the car with me because she licks her lips and smacks non-stop. Even the smacking sound made when I hear kissing on tv drives me crazy. I have to leave the room or change the channel.

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  79. The noise of a utensil on someone’s teeth makes my whole body tense up…my pulse accelerates, and it gets hard to breathe. I am constantly asking those around me to please (PLEASE) not scrape their teeth with a fork.
    I’ve always hated the sound of someone eating with their mouth full of food. I cannot think of a more repulsive and disgusting sound than the slurping, squishing noise of food being chewed. Just recently I’ve started feeling almost rage when someone eats something crunchy, like Corn nuts. I hate the crunching and slurping! It makes me want to slap the food out of their hand and scream.
    I’ve endured a lifetime of people rolling their eyes at me or telling me I’m “fussy”. I am always polite, but firm when I ask my friends/family to avoid some of these sounds around me. Let them think what they want…better than suffering in silence! When I can’t avoid it, I wear ear plugs and endure.
    Since Misophonia isn’t officially considered a psychological condition (seriously, what the heck?) it has also taken some time to find the right therapist who takes me seriously and has given me support and good coping advice.
    Slowly but surely, people will become more educated about this truly debilitating condition. Hang in there fellow Misophoniacs!

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  80. Reading all of those comments truly gives me a lot of validation. I suffered from misophonia ever since I was a child, and I struggle with a couple of the most common triggers mentioned already by the rest of you. The condition itself is no new discovery for me, I ran across the term misophonia a couple of years ago.

    The point that I would like to make here is that I actually did manage to control the problem and to find come ease through mindfulness, conscious breathing, and years of meditation. It still hurts sometimes, but when I tap into my breath, the sound becomes just what it is – a temporary nuisance. I also take great care of myself, both physically and emotionally, and manage my life in a smart way – for example, when I really have to focus on some creative work, I plan to do it when I know the silence will be guaranteed. I live in the music. I take a great deal of time with myself when I read, paint, or walk in nature.

    Another thing that I discovered is that my reactions aggravate when I am in a generally low emotional state. I work hard every day (sport, positive attitude, healthy eating) to keep my level of vibration high, which makes me more resistant to the sound triggers.

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  81. It is a huge relief to finally understand my “Misophonia” and since reading up about it I have found it easier to put reasoning to my reactions.
    I have been sensitive to certain sounds for most of my life. The trigger sounds make me feel very irritated and anxious. I become rude sometimes by mimicking the sounds or become very nasty and act irrationally – people obviously do not understand – (Fortunately I manage to control my reaction most of the time which feels difficult because of the intensity of the emotion)
    Certain pitched voices also affect me – it feels like they are attacking my soul and pulling my insides out. I get heart palpitations and a crippling hot/cold feeling right through my body.
    Its a variety of noises/sounds.
    Yet, like some of the earlier comments made, there are sounds that I like and which I find very soothing or make me feel happy.
    Mostly, I like quiet.

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  82. Omg I never even thought there was a word to describe my issue.. every single one annoys me… I just thought, well I never actually put them all together as anything .. wow this can’t be true. No way I am dumbfounded 🤨🤨🤨

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  83. I’ve been suffering from Misophonia, knowingly, for the last 8 years. Know that I know what it’s called, and that other people are like me, it’s helping me find coping mechanisms. I thought I’d share something that seems to help me after an episode. Like today for instance, I’ve been at work all day and it’s the first time I’ve had to have noise cancelling headphones on all day. My stress level is hurting me (tight muscles, heart beating fast, cold sweats). I found a natural product called Ashwagandha. I’m not a believer in homeothermy, but I find that this knocks my stress levels down quickly, so that I can concentrate again (and feel normal). Hope this helps someone.

    Reply

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