Currently there is no universally effective treatment for misophonia and the search for a misophonia cure is slowly being studied and researched.

However, members of our forum have some suggestions to help reduce the intensity of triggers and discuss possible treatments. You can find the Support Forum here

Some people believe that avoidance of triggers may make the condition worse yet others find stress can be reduced by avoiding one’s known trigger events. People with misophonia are often engaged in seeking out effective coping mechanisms to use when exposed to problematic sounds.

Paying attention to the basics may help. People who have a healthy and balanced diet, engage in consistent and adequate exercise and manage stress may have less intense or less frequent problems with sensitivity to sounds.

Treatment possibilities for MisophoniaSome possible treatment methods to explore are: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Neurofeedback (NFB), Tinnitus Retraining Therapy (TRT) and psycho-therapeutic hypnotherapy. There are other treatment methods as well.

The use of sound generating equipment, ear plugs and sound masking audio may be of use and are worth investigating. Some people have had success with these methods of treatment and symptom management.

In your attempts to find relief and manage symptoms, you may need to explore more than one treatment method. An effective combination of different approaches may emerge. Don’t give up!

You may find a treatment method that helps you!

Explore all the methods other people use to see if they are helpful to you. Many people find ways to reduce the symptoms they experience and in so doing, help make their lives easier. You may wish to review some resources available on the Sound Rage website.

Various treatment methods will be added to this section when they become available for review.  Have you heard of a treatment or had success with a coping mechanism? Share it with others!

Ads for misophonia treatments may be placed on this page. Please contact the admin for details. The treatments presented in any ads appearing on this page will be investigated for professionalism in presentation and content but these treatments may not be clinically and/or scientifically proven. Since there is no known cure or effective treatment known at this time, potential treatment modalities will be allowed to advertise on this page. However, any treatment modalities appearing here are not specifically endorsed by the Misophonia Online Website.

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40 comments:

georgia varbleJuly 25, 2014 at 7:22 pmReply

56 years old …. probbly level 5 or 6. Good to know I’m not alone. Hopeful that this web site will offer me methods to cope.

Catherine ZahraJuly 29, 2014 at 1:51 pmReply

Hello. Please help me if you can. My son is 24years old and he has been suffering from mysophonia since he was 10 years old. It is a nightmare not just for him or to live with him but also because I cannot seem to find understanding or acknowledgement of this condition in Malta. consult.Please write to me and tell me if there is an existing help in England where we can come and consult.

He has been wrongly diagnosed with OCD since he was 10years.

I will greatly appreciate any help.

Regards

Catherine Zahra.

LizaJuly 30, 2014 at 6:36 amReply

Catherine,

Try this website. http://misophoniatreatment.com. There’s a lot of suggestions and Tom is very responsive. Good luck!

Laraine PipolyJuly 31, 2014 at 4:27 amReply

I have had this condition since a young age. I am now 70 years old. I didn’t know what to call it. A couple of years ago I found out about misophonia and it’s discription fits me to a T. It seems to be getting worse the older I get.
I live in the Long Beach area of California. I have to plan going out to eat. I have developed relationships with some of the restaurant managers over the years. I go in and explain that I have a hearing problem that magnifies the noises in the restaurant, in particular the music. Why do they feel they have to blast music when people want to visit with the family, friends that they came in. They are NOT at a concert.
This afternoon my husband and I were at a new restaurant near our home. The music was very high with twanging guitars etc. I told them my problem and that when I hear loud music I just want to get up and flea the situation. They were kind enough to turn it down until we leave.
Just before we got ready to leave another waitress came over and asked how our meal was. We begain to talk and I told her they could turn up the music because we were leaving. Turns out that she has had this problem all of her life. She appeared to be about 25 yrs old. She got tears in her eyes when I explained it to her. I wrote down misophonia on a piece of paper for her and she was coming home and getting on the Internet to do more investigation. She says she has had a lot of problems with her family about this. Now she is going to enlighten them.
If anyone wants to talk, please e-mail me @ LFrancone1@aol.com.

LucyAugust 6, 2014 at 9:57 pmReply

Today I discovered this irritation I have has a diagnosis!!.. I have suffered with this for as long as I can remember and I’m 27 now. I have 2 children and I can’t even feed them or be in the room whilst all this chewing ect is happening.. I’m at stage 5 – 6 but I feel more anger towards my partner. I have to sleep with my hands covering my ears! I’m so glad I looked in to it as I thought I was on my own. But now I can explain to people and give them a better understand and maybe they will be less annoying around me

HaydenAugust 9, 2014 at 12:30 amReply

I found out about misophonia just yesterday, I am 22 and cannot think back to a time when I didn’t have an absolute hatred for certain sounds and noises.. I had always been told to “grow up”, “get over it”, “stop being pathetic” but I don’t think anyone can understand unless they suffer it too..
I am a clear 9 on the scale, and I always thought I was very alone in what I was trying in vain to deal with. I never sought psychologist support as was too nervous about the stigma of being labelled with anything, and no one seemed to understand what I went through so why should they be any different.. Although I cannot find a magic cure at least I now have a base to start from, a website to send people to that explains me perfectly, and the knowledge that I am not alone.

TaviAugust 10, 2014 at 4:46 amReply

All my life, I have had a severe hatred of gum chewing/smacking! I never knew it could be diagnosed as anything more than just something that really irritates me. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve noticed other mouth noises and bodily noises have begun to bother me, as well. So how do I cope with it? I’m a paramedic! I have to deal with people making all kinds of imaginable mouth noises!! Some smells bother me too…. those are also part of my job description! I find that because my awareness of them is so heightened, I am a better able to detect and discern inconsistencies and subtle changes in my patient’s status. In other words, my misophonia makes me a better clinician! Imagine that….

Randy BAugust 10, 2014 at 9:14 pmReply

Most of my adult life I have had this issue. I never thought I was the only person in the world with this problem. I’m so glad to know that I’m not the only one, I wish there was something that could make it go away.

Sabina JackmanAugust 12, 2014 at 12:27 pmReply

I am absolutely at stage 9 when I hear anything repetitive, usually background noise, clocks ticking, pens clicking, teaspoon clinking when stirring coffee, roosters, dogs barking, loud bass/repetitive music. Anything that seems like I have no control over or anything that I feel will never stop. Even when the noise does eventually stop (like roosters crowing, dog barking or music) I can still hear it for hours later, it’s just stuck in my head and sometimes I cannot tell if the noise is real or not which makes me feel crazy at times.

I now use a fan, ear plugs and play rain music or white noise on repeat (which is funny because the white noise, rain and fan are all repetitive noises… BUT maybe it’s because they drown out the noise and I know I can control them myself.

Anyway so glad to know this ‘crazy thing’ I’ve lived with for over a decade or more (I’m 38) is a real disorder and that I can finally find people who get me and understand what I am going through.

MartjieAugust 12, 2014 at 7:51 pmReply

Level 9 :(

I’ve moved 8 times in 7 years due to “noisy neighbours”
Working in open plan I have to listen to classical music on my earphones to calm me down and drown out noise.
I often get enraged and ask people in the office to turn down their music. (Which is a problem as specially since I am a contract worker and not an permanent employee.

I often fantasise about hitting someone when they are making a noise, whether it is a loud chewer, heavy breather, a cleaner polishing the floor or an upstairs neighbour walking to loudly. I unplug my boyfriends fridge when I stay over, and I’m always the one telling people to keep quite.
I used to go to the Cinema twice a week as I love movies, but I can’t go anymore as I always end up confronting someone and then leave feeling stressed and annoyed because people talked or chewed popcorn loudly 3 rows away.

I think its about time I get some help. I always thought i just have super sensitive hearing, but at least there is some treatment options I will look into

HarryAugust 17, 2014 at 1:15 pmReply

I empathise. I quit going to the cinema 30 years ago (in my teens) as it became a trauma. I never understood why no one, it seemed, could get through a movie without a super-sized tub of popcorn that they’d crunch, mostly with open mouths, and make last through to the end. Nevermind the nauseating smell…
My friends weren’t bothered in the slightest, in fact they were often “crunchers” themselves. I wanted to lash out and thump the nearest cruncher.
When asked after the movie for my opinion, I’d rarely be able to provide any reasonable synopsis because I had spent the previous two hours stressed and distracted.
Even though I now realise that there is a reason for my hypersensitivity, I still question whether in the absence of it I wouldn’t be still completely grossed-out anyway by those who bother me the most now. Some people out there have obscene eating habits regardless…
Open-plan offices… OMG, where do I start on that subject? Better that I don’t!

EmilyOctober 15, 2014 at 11:31 amReply

OMG the movies are the worst! Disrupts my whole movie!

JessicaAugust 13, 2014 at 8:02 amReply

I thought I was just being a b*tch cause that’s what everyone was telling me! I didn’t know I actually had a REAL condition until I saw a friend’s post on facebook from OMG Facts – “Getting annoyed at someone when we listen to them eating or breathing is called Misophonia, and it’s an actual neurological disorder.” It made me curious so I googled it and found this site. Thank Goodness for this site!!!!! :)

On a serious note though, I have auditory processing disorder which makes it hard for me distinguish all of the audio/voices/music/etc. that I am hearing, but I am POSITIVE that I have Misophonia…..
the question that my specialist has not been able to answer is “Why can I not “hear” some things like my husband talking to me from the other end of our 3 person couch with the tv on at an average volume in the living room with the ceiling fan going, but I can “hear” our daughter doing her chore and humming in the kitchen which is two rooms away (with ceiling fans going) at the very same time, and yell for her to stop humming cause it is driving me crazy…..Any ideas??

AndrianAugust 25, 2014 at 8:57 amReply

Jessica,
I absolutely know what you are talking about. I am the exact same way. I went so far as to have an evaluation with an audiologist to try and diagnose hearing loss as I too have a hard time hearing my husband, low frequency sounds, etc.. yet I can hear the small friction sounds of fingers rubbing. This was before I found out what misophonia was and found it fits me to a tee- level 5. The audiologist did say I have mild hearing loss but nothing to do for it as I am young- 30 years old. But all my life I have struggled with tolerating various noises and never knew there was an actual diagnosis/condition. Wish I had some insight for you but just wanted you to know you are not alone.

Tarren CAugust 13, 2014 at 5:39 pmReply

I am 19. I’m also an auditory learner when I started noticing certain sounds instantly impacting me (I was 10 or 11) I assumed it was a packaged deal. My family has just told me to stop being a grouch. I never could understand why these sounds would make me so irritable, but they never noticed that they were even making the sounds in question. I’m so glad to know I am not alone. Something that helps me is to focus on a song I like until it is stuck in my head, it doesn’t make the trigger sound go away but it gives me something else to focus on until it has stopped.

HeatherAugust 13, 2014 at 6:17 pmReply

I am absolutely gobsmacked! I am almost 40 years old and have dealt with this for at least 30 of those years. I had NO idea that others have this. I knew things irritated people but to me I seemed over the top. I have felt like such a nit-picky bitch for soo long. I am a SAHM of 5 boys who are always loud. My youngest is almost 5 and I am at the end of my rope. He goes to Mother’s Day Out 4 days a week now largely due to the fact that I want to scream from hearing sound effects he makes while playing with toys. People who don’t have this totally do not understand and I am sure think I am just being selfish. I love my boys absolutely. I do not love noise. LOL

My husband has a leg bouncing thing he does. As you know, I’m sure, it makes me crazy. I have to cover my eyes so I can’t see it. I get so frustrated because we have been married 17 years, he knows it irritates me, yet he still does it. I know, rationally, that he can’t help it. But oh does it kill me. Now I am showing him this and hopefully it helps!

One more thing. I am in absolute awe of anyone who has this and has to work with other people. I truly do not know what I would do. The whole open office thing is all the rage now for several years. I cringe just thinking about it.

DebbieAugust 14, 2014 at 8:16 amReply

Good Day all .

I come to you all today to ask for your dear help and adivce. what better way to do it than to ask someone who has that problem too.
Im 25 years old “I DONT SUFFER FROM MISOPHONIA” but my boyfriend i think does.

He burst his eardrum on a water ski fall on his ear.

we started dating about 8 months ago and know each other 3-4 years now.
my realtionship with him is getting verry hard.
the othe day he posted on his wall on facebook this qoute: Getting angry at people when we listen to them breathing or eating is called Misophonia, which is an actual brain disorder.

and i immidiatly thought to myself something is up with him,he really hates it when i chew chips and ive also told him that its not such a big deal but now i know more of this disorder looking it op on google.
he also stuggles with alot of the socializing aspects..he doesnt show emotion easy and weve been fighting alot about this.. i just need some advice first hand on if this disorder can complicate emotional attachment to a person and if this problem can have an effect on relationship. his way of handling things are not normal its in a way of not caring what the other person asks and wants or needs. and if i show emotion it doesnt seem to have an impact on him. is this anyhow related to misophonia? any advice will be highly appreciated,.

deborahp@voltex.co.za

AidyAugust 28, 2014 at 3:05 pmReply

Debbie,

I have suffered from Misaphonia since I can remember. I’m 28 years of age and have been in a relationship for 1.5 years now. I have to be honest, it must be tough on my partner. After reading your comment regarding lack of emotion I have to admit that this is how I am most of the time. Misaphonia can be so emotionally draining for sufferers, sometimes I tend to just close myself off from others in an effort to not feel stressed or any of the other negative emotions which come from certain triggers. Its difficult to offer any advice as Misaphonia (as far as I’m concerned) is such a complex condition. Just try to remember that your other half is suffering from this and that deep down inside he doesn’t want to hurt you (emotionally of course). You need to know the exact triggers that he cant cope with and to make sure you don’t do any of these things around him! Literally, kick them all to the curb! This is the only way things will become easier for you both.

AllenAugust 14, 2014 at 3:22 pmReply

Coping with Misophonia is the most difficult part of my life, but I seem to build more tolerance as I get older. For me, avoidance is the best treatment. I went from living miserably with 4 people at a young age to living by myself for two years. Now when I experience a trigger sound it’s still annoying but not to the same extent. I’ve read that avoiding trigger sounds may make it worst but for me its simply not true. Exercising seems to take a little stress and anxiety off the top. I’m especially annoyed if I lacked physical activity that day. For advice if you know someone with Misophonia, just simply don’t do those trigger sounds around them. Gum is the worst because the chewing never stops!

AdamAugust 17, 2014 at 5:21 pmReply

I am not sure if I have misophonia. I have the symptoms of misophonia — I become very angry, sometimes enraged, by the sound of people eating (especially with their mouth open), drinking, slurping, and opening soda cans. I feel awful for having such negative feelings toward friends and family, when I know they can’t help it!

I am 19, and have only begun to notice this within the last few years, which is why I am hesitant to say I have it (seeing that many people began noticing symptoms much earlier). I am very reluctant to fall into the hysterical self-diagnosis that many people fall into today simply because I have a few symptoms. I am hoping that, despite the gradual worsening of the symptoms, it too shall pass.

I have told my parents about this problem, in hopes of finding ways to manage it, but I’m only told to “get over it.” Once I was able to put a name to this condition, I told them about it, but was only told that misophonia doesn’t exist (my dad, who is a doctor, has said this many a time, yet has never even heard of it before) or that I am just being sensitive and need to get over it.

ASorryHeartAugust 18, 2014 at 7:34 amReply

I’m SO glad a friend shared this link. My 5yo most definitely suffers from this disorder, and bc he also has ADHD/OCD it’s really affecting every area of his life, and in turn all of ours as well. He started kinder last week and it’s TORTURE for him. We have to find our way, somehow :( This is very, very real and traumatic. Thanks to those who shared!

PattyAugust 21, 2014 at 3:27 pmReply

Thank you. It is good to know I am not alone. I criticize myself for this, thinking I am a bad person for getting so stressed by seemingly innocuous sounds. People do not understand this. I do not understand this. But it has gotten to be an issue n the last 10 years or so (I am 57).

MeaghanAugust 29, 2014 at 12:37 pmReply

Until about a month ago, I never knew this was a thing! I’m 16 years old, and at a level 6 already. What gets me going the most is loud breathing, or chewing. Scrapping and the pen clicking are pretty bad as well. I always thought it was wrong that I got so upset by the breathing thing! Nice to know this has a name and that I’m not just crazy!

NinaSeptember 12, 2014 at 2:04 amReply

I’m a 59 year old high school teacher who didn’t know that this was an actual disorder until I happened upon the term “misophonia” when I googled “low tolerance for noise” tonight. Yesterday after school I went to my principal, nearly in tears, and told him I was having a nervous breakdown because I was trying to mark papers in my room and there was a group of noisy students in the hallway outside my door. Today in one of my classes I asked a student to stop cracking her knuckles. One of my classroom rules is that if I see or hear gum I will ask that it be thrown away. When students click pens I get agitated and ask them to stop. My intolerance has been getting progressively worse and I’m turning into a cranky old lady. Last night I called my employee assistance program and have a counselling appt. next week. And I have an appt. with my family doctor next week. Also, I’m a perfectionist and that tendency is getting worse the older I get. Has anyone found that medication such as Zoloft helps? I have 2 years and 3 months until I can retire without a penalty and would like to make it until then. Right now every day is a challenge. I’ve been telling friends that I’m struggling with the school environment but they don’t understand. Thanks to those of you who posted. It’s a relief to know that I’m not the only one trying to cope with this.

EmmaSeptember 22, 2014 at 2:15 pmReply

Hi Nina,

I totlly get it! I am a 37 yr old teacher – music of all subjects and the school environment is driving me crazy. I can feel my blood pressure rise and my chest tighten on a daily basis. It is also getting worse as time goes on and I feel that some days I will literally ‘crack up’. I feel I should tell my employers but don’t want to seem like I’m totally bonkers. I am actually retraining as a play therapist as I know I cannot stay in this career.

I am actually going to the doctor today but really am unsure what they can do.

NinaSeptember 27, 2014 at 12:38 pmReply

Hi Emma,
I hope that your doctor didn’t dismiss your very real issue. My appt. is Wed. and I’m going to give her the brochure from this site. The counsellor that I met with last week totally got what I’m going through, even though she hadn’t heard of misophonia. She’s going to work with me to rewire my brain. Have you seen this site? http://misophoniatreatment.com/hate-sounds.I haven’t had a chance to read everything yet but I watched the first video and it certainly gave me hope. I have told my principal and VP that I’m struggling and getting help. My VP thinks that his wife has misophonia and asked me to forward the information to him. And when I my Department Head, who has become a good friend, about it, she realized that her husband also has it. I’ve talked to him and he’s definitely a fellow misophone. I feel like I’ve opened up floodgates by being open about it. I would encourage you to do the same. I’m actually coping better with my environment since I’ve had so much affirmation that my intolerance is not by choice. Not beating myself up has given me more energy to cope. Best of luck with your career change (probably a good idea) and getting support from friends, family and doctors / counsellors.

ninaSeptember 27, 2014 at 12:58 pmReply

Should have proofread before posting. Here’s the link so that you can click on it:
http://misophoniatreatment.com/hate-sounds

stephenSeptember 14, 2014 at 3:23 pmReply

I’m shocked that I’ve never been diagnosed with misophonia, I’m 52 and according to the scale I’m a 9. I’ve been plagued with not being able to bear noise from neighbours all my life especially the noise from their television or music. I’ve been hospitalised twice with anxiety and depression and been put on all sorts of meds to help me cope. I always knew the meds wouldn’t work and now I understand why! My intolerance of these noises which have blighted me at every level is real and recognised as a condition and no amount of medication is going to change that. I am now in the process of trying CBT hypnosis and hope that it will have some effect in my learning to live again free from stress and anxiety. I don’t know if anyone has the same problems as me but I’m on edge all the time just waiting for the neighbours noise to start and my blood pressure is now through the roof. My only hope is to save enough to buy a detached house and hopefully that will help. I salute anyone who is living with this condition as it can be such a disruptive force to come to terms with.

JessSeptember 15, 2014 at 9:14 pmReply

I’m 20 and only just found out that what I have is an actual condition. I thought I was just someone who likes to pay attention to extreme detail. I was just browsing the internet and found an post on neurological disorders, which I find interesting anyway because I’m studying Psychology at University. But then when it was describing the symptoms, I saw similarities. So like anyone else, I looked it up on more websites and found it!

I’m actually glad I found it and I am not going insane. I read about the self test thing on here and I would say I’m a 4-5. I cannot go to sleep without listening to my music, which kind of annoys me because I can’t cuddle with my boyfriend. He says he understands but I can’t help but feel guilty. I can’t go out or stay in to eat with him as I end up telling him to stop or slow down. I always feel like a horrible person because he doesn’t realize he’s doing it. Sometimes I can’t even sleep in the same bed as him because he wants to cuddle up with me but I can hear and feel him breathing on me, which angers and irritates me so much. I’ve tried to control it but it’s so hard. Other things like whistling, clicking of fingers, heavy footsteps or clocks ticking really annoys me.

I kind of want to get help but it’s more the fact that if I tell my mum (who I don’t live with anymore and is unaware of everything) how I feel, she will think I’m just being pathetic. It’s also one of those things I don’t know how to go about it – do you go to the GP or to a counselor at University? I really don’t want to waste anyone’s time if I’m going to the wrong person.

I feel a lot more better knowing I’m not alone anymore.

NinaSeptember 27, 2014 at 12:41 pmReply

Jess, print out the brochure on this site and take it to a GP and a counsellor. Share it with your bf, friends and family. I just replied above to Emma with more info. You are definitely not alone.

BelaSeptember 26, 2014 at 8:24 amReply

i was reading all of your comments and i realised that in time it gets worst.i’m 20. I still haven’t test myself to find my level because i’m afraid of how high it might be. i have all of your problems and disorders so much that i want to violent anyone who does those sounds or movement including my mom. I’m albanian, i live here and i’m sure that if i go to visit myself to a doctor or psycologist they will not be aware of misophonia and they probably will give me the wrong diagnoze, even thought i’ll give it a try. if i don’t find any help here I only hope not to lose my friends and boyfrend. lucky you who have where to rely to…

MelissaSeptember 26, 2014 at 7:57 pmReply

It’s good to know I am not crazy! This condition has grown progressively worse over the past ten years and I don’t know how to stop it. It started in college. I would be taking a test and in the absolute silence would almost amplify any noise- tapping of pens, clicking of pens, popping/snapping of gum (AHH!),tapping of feet. Anything like that would drive me batty! It was hard to conentrate on tests because those sounds were deafening! In the subsequent years it’s just gotten worse. I have even reached into my best friends mouth while SHE was driving and pulled the gum from her mouth because she chews like a cow. I could have easily caused an accident. In the past few years, it has no effected my relationships with boyfriends.

My last boyfriend was Chinese and if anyone is familiar with that culture they would know that their eating habits are different from Americans- especially in the soup department. Between his constant slurping of ANY liquids, to his teeth scraping across the fork after he took a bite, I couldn’t help but to actually scream at him to stop. Between that and some other things, we had to break up. Every relationship I have been in after I feel like I am just waiting for the rage to come out again. I am usualyl ok in the beginning but eventually, the monster comes out and I snap and ask them to stop whatever urks me.

It saddens me that I feel like I may end up a lonely maid because of this condition. What saddens me more is that there does not seem to be a definitive cure. I started therapy a few months ago and I was told that my misophonia may be caused from PTSD from a childhood abuse. Might be worth looking into?

steveSeptember 27, 2014 at 6:22 pmReply

Im 43 and suffered with this ever since i can remember

I am clearly a 9 but occasionally wish i was a 10 so i could punch the guy in my office who always eats crisps and apples

Ive thrown my best friends food out of the car window if hes been eating crisps food while ive been drivibg

My partner thinks its childish but she really doesnt realise how much hatred i get when i hear her flip flops.

Id give anything for a cure

LisaSeptember 27, 2014 at 10:09 pmReply

My daughter has the same issues so many things make her so angry she will be 18 this year she has lost so many friends and is so angry all the time she’s got to the point she goes to her room and sits alone I’ve been so worried about her maybe going to depression.
I hate to see her day by day suffer the way she does.
Any suggestions on how I might help her?

Rachel SolomonSeptember 28, 2014 at 10:48 pmReply

Hi all! I found out about Misophonia last year by accident – some random general knowledge thing on the interent. That changed my LIFE. Just knowing that it was called something – that I wasn’t completely crazy for wanting to slit my own father’s throat for the way his little tongue was rolling around in his mouth and the clicking noises his jaw made. And also, thankfully, that other people cna understand it.

The first thing I want everyone to know is that I experience both auditory AND visual triggers. For example, sometimes, not only the sound of someone chewing, but the SIGHT, will send me into panicked rage. The sight of a quivering jaw, the shaking of a leg, the sight of someone biting their nails – Mostly it is repetitive actions and noises. These two kinds of triggers make me want to murder.

I used to get intense rage, anxiety and panic – from as young as 8 years old I would death stare my family while they eat, making disgusted, exasperated noises, sighing heavily, blocking my ears, rolling my eyes. Eventually pretty much every night would end with me leaving the room and crying silent, angry tears as I ate my dinner alone at the table while the family was in the living room.

I have learned to curb the feelings of rage and panic – I go through three steps usually.

1. I ask the person to stop what they are doing (if it’s not unreasonable to ask, I wouldn’t ask someone to stop breathing because it was annoying me – although I have been close MANY times.)
My friends and family know I suffer form this disorder, and so after a while I gave up on being polite and simply say, for example: “Are you going to be sniffing this entire time?”, or “Leave your fucking nails alone” – if I have to. Because they know about it and love me they usually respond with sorry!, or they tell me to fuck off – which I do. They are entitled to do the things that annoy me – I just don’t have to be around for them.

2.
I leave the room. If the trigger is something that cannot be stopped without being unfair – someone’s breathing noises, the scratching of a pen on paper, the clicking of keyboard keys etc – then I leave the room.

3. I make my own white noise in my head. This has been something I have been trying to get the hang of, and am slowly getting there. Its not easy and most often doesn’t work, but when it does, it’s really helpful. If I am at dinner with friends and I don’t want to leave the table (and I obviously can’t ask them all to simply stop all of their bodily functions), then try to stop thinking. I stare down at my plate and eat, simply focusing on not thinking about anything. Nodding my head here and there for the odd conversation input, stuff like that. It’s like white noise.

(Coincidentally, I have also found that listening to white noise playlists on youtube while trying to work or whatever helps a lot – to distract from both auditory and visual triggers).

Lex GodwillOctober 6, 2014 at 7:32 pmReply

The only effective treatment for misophonia I have ever experienced is consuming marijuana. When I was high, I could listen to all my triggers. I was so happy that it didn’t affect me anymore, and I couldn’t help but smile and laugh about it. It was the greatest and only relief I have ever had from misophonia. I even stayed around the people creating the sounds that trigger it, because it was amazing to be able to hear them and be unaffected, just like any other sounds.

However, the next day, when I wasn’t high anymore, the sounds were excruciatingly painful to listen to again.

It would be great to understand what happened, and why I wasn’t triggered by the sounds while under the influence. I didn’t even have that much at all, and I am not a regular smoker either.

lucyOctober 7, 2014 at 5:30 pmReply

i have dealt with this since i can remember. My younger brother would always make these awful throat/nasal clearing sounds that drove me up the wall! I could not sit next to him in a car or at a restaurant. this did not happen often, so otherwise , i avoided being around him when he was sick. we were close growing up, but this always but a weird block between us. I would try to sympathize by mimicking the noises. I hear this is normal for sufferers. It never worked. It grew into eating noises. Most people didnt bother me, but for some reason my brothers jaw clicked. Did i associate the early phobia just with him? It grew more with any outside noise while i was trying to sleep. Whispers, music, television…I Prayed to GOD that would go deaf. I felt irrational and crazy….

It is nice to know i am not insane for this. some 30 years dealing with it, and i just now looked t up. I think knowing helps..

StephanieOctober 14, 2014 at 3:24 pmReply

I have a problem with people “smacking their lips”. It started in the fifth grade because a teacher I did not like did it all the time. It drove me crazy. I cannot think of a time when I noticed it before but now, ten years later, my hatred for the noise has grown stronger and stronger. My family was very confused but very concerned on why something so simple that most people couldn’t hear impacted my attitude so much. When I was in high school I convinced my mother to take me to an ear specialist. When I first met with the doctor he was so confused he had no idea what to do. He had never heard of one noise making a person so crazy. I was put in a booth to do special hearing test which all came back normal. A few weeks later he called us back asking to come in. He did an MRI on my head and when it came back clear he explained he was looking for a tumor. It blows my mind that so many people seem to have the same issues with similar noises and yet doctors who specialize in eyes, ears, mouths, and throats have no idea on what causes it. This problem has caused me to attempt suicide multiple times in my life and had sent me into depression before I received help. While I am no longer suicidal or depressed the noise still bothers me. It has gotten worse over the years and I am scared that it will continue to get worse. We cannot expect a disease to be uncovered without raising awareness. I hate meeting new people because I have to explain why I have to plug my ears and grind my teeth every time a person smacks their lips but the truth is that the irritation I feel because of that sound won’t go away until I do. The truth is that it is painful to eat with certain people who are unaware of my condition or sit through a teacher’s lecture who smacks his or her lips while teaching.

c. robOctober 15, 2014 at 12:20 pmReply

I am the mother of a 14 year old boy who has misophonia. It is mostly focused on me and noises I make with my mouth. They are sounds associated with disapproval. Or the way I say my S’s. It is now gone beyond him getting angry about these involuntary noises. Recently he started accusing me if spitting in him. I could be across from him in a room and he will say I spit on him. He seems to have his reactions focused only on me at this time but in the past he had reactions to things his father did. Because of a divorce his father no longer lo
Ives here so he does not currently react to him.

I love my son and I know he loves me. I try to not do the triggers but almost all of them are involuntary and I want to keep breathing.

My main question is about him thinking I am spitting on him. Has anyone had these types if symptomes along with the misophonia?

Thank you for your help .

AlisonOctober 20, 2014 at 10:34 pmReply

C.Rob, I sympathise. It does sound as if he’s becoming more sensitive and you are absolutely right that there are some things you just can’t stop doing. Please do seek help!

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